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dc.contributor.authorWang, Junen_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-06-09T18:17:28Z
dc.date.available2006-06-09T18:17:28Z
dc.date.issued2006-04-07en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/10508
dc.description.abstractLow speed urban streets are designed to provide both access and mobility, and accommodate multiple road users, such as bicyclists and pedestrians. However, speeds on these facilities often exceed the intended operating speeds as well as their design speeds. Several studies have indicated that the design speed concept, as implemented in the roadway design process in the United States, does not guarantee a consistent alignment that promotes uniform operating speeds less than design speeds. To overcome these apparent shortfalls of the design speed approach, a promising design approach is a performance-based design procedure with the incorporation of operating speeds. Under this procedure, the geometric parameters of the roadways are selected based on their influences on the desired operating speeds. However, this approach requires a clear understanding of the relationships between operating speeds and various road environments. Although numerous studies have developed operating speed models, most of these previous studies have concentrated on high speed rural two-lane highways. In contrast, highway designers and planners have very little information regarding the influence of low speed urban street environments on drivers' speeds. This dissertation investigated the relationship between drivers' speed choices and their associated low speed urban roadway environments by analyzing second-by-second in-vehicle GPS data from over 200 randomly selected vehicles in the Atlanta, Georgia area. The author developed operating speed models for low speed urban street segments based on roadway alignment, cross-section characteristics, roadside features, and adjacent land uses. The author found the number of lanes per direction of travel had the most significant influence on drivers' speeds on urban streets. Other significant variables include on-street parking, sidewalk presence, roadside object density and offset, T-intersection and driveway density, raised curb, and adjacent land use. The results of this research effort can help highway designers and planners better understand expected operating speeds when they design and evaluate low speed urban roadways.en_US
dc.format.extent1437574 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectUrbanen_US
dc.subjectGPS
dc.subjectLow speed
dc.subjectOperating speed
dc.subject.lcshGlobal Positioning Systemen_US
dc.subject.lcshSpeed limitsen_US
dc.subject.lcshAutomobile drivingen_US
dc.titleOperating Speed Models for Low Speed Urban Enviroments based on In-Vehcile GPSen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentCivil and Environmental Engineeringen_US
dc.description.advisorCommittee Chair: Dr. Karen Dixon; Committee Member: Dr. John D Leonard II; Committee Member: Dr. Kwok-Leung Tsui; Committee Member: Dr. Peter P Parsonson; Committee Member: Dr. William Bachmanen_US


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