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dc.contributor.authorJoseph, Anjalien_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-06-09T18:19:28Z
dc.date.available2006-06-09T18:19:28Z
dc.date.issued2006-04-11en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/10523
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this thesis was to identify the characteristics of path segments and routes that are associated with where older residents choose to walk for recreation or for getting to destinations in retirement communities. The goal was to use the findings from this study to help formulate criteria and strategic choices that can be used to design retirement communities that support walking among elderly residents. Case studies were conducted at three Continuing Care Retirement Communities. The study shows that route choice for walking to destinations is shaped by practical considerations of distance and convenience and largely determined by the relative location of destination and origin. On the other hand, route choice for recreational walking is more complex and is determined by local, relational and structural environmental characteristics of the path segments that comprise the routes as well as characteristics of the residents themselves. Residents chose routes of different difficulty level for walking based on their physical abilities and health. This study also found that many residents chose to walk indoors for recreation, especially along corridors between resident apartments. Understanding how the different factors together shape route choice leads to the clarification of design alternatives. This study suggests that designing campuses to support walking involves not only a careful consideration of individual local path segment characteristics but also an understanding how path segments and routes fit within the larger network of path segments on campus. Further, it is important to design routes with a range of characteristics and a range of challenge so that residents have many options to choose from and they have the option to move from a lower level of challenge to a higher one when they feel ready.en_US
dc.format.extent10123955 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectElderlyen_US
dc.subjectWalking
dc.subjectRetirement communities
dc.subjectPath design
dc.subject.lcshWalkingen_US
dc.subject.lcshAging Psychological aspectsen_US
dc.subject.lcshPedestrian areas United States Planningen_US
dc.subject.lcshTrails Design and constructionen_US
dc.titleWhere older people walk: Assessing the relationship between physical environmental factors and walking behavior of older adultsen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentArchitectureen_US
dc.description.advisorCommittee Chair: Zimring, Craig; Committee Member: Bafna, Sonit; Committee Member: Day, Kristen; Committee Member: Kohl, Harold W.; Committee Member: Sparling, Phillipen_US


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