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dc.contributor.authorDudka, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDas, K. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAnnis, Patricia A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-07-11T18:04:58Z
dc.date.available2006-07-11T18:04:58Z
dc.date.issued2000-05-02en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/10774
dc.description.abstractComposts produced from a mixture of wool processing by-products and other components (e.g., wood-shavings, cotton-gin trash, biosolids, etc.) have a high content of major nutrients (NPK), high water holding capacity, and low levels of soluble salts, and they have slightly acidic to neutral pH. These composts were successfully used to grow ornamentals in a greenhouse, to establish turfgrass from seeds, and to produce sod on plastic. The market research showed that, in Georgia, the turfgrass industry and retail garden centers would be the largest and most profitable markets for wool-based composts and potting mixes, respectively. Cost-volume-profit analysis (CVP) indicated that production and sale of about 15,000 tons of the compost product would be a break-even point in units for the composting side of a hypothetical business. Since composting is also a waste management operation, revenues from accepting waste (tipping fees) can improve business profitability and, therefore, lower the break-even point.en_US
dc.format.extent2536369 bytes
dc.format.extent232 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/html
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technology.Department of Crop and Soil Sciencesen_US
dc.rightsAccess restricted to authorized Georgia Tech users only.en_US
dc.subjectWool-based composten_US
dc.subjectCost-volume-profit analysis (CVP)en_US
dc.subjectWool wasteen_US
dc.titleTechnical and Economic Aspects of Utilizing Wool Composts in Horticultural Marketsen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Georgiaen_US


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