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dc.contributor.authorKelly, Patricken_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-07-11T18:20:31Z
dc.date.available2006-07-11T18:20:31Z
dc.date.issued2002-05-14en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/10800
dc.description.abstractNo matter how much good they might do, very few ideas can be or will be developed and commercialized, unless the profit opportunity can justify the investments. Patents serve as fences that can be built around properties, making it worthwhile for the owner to do the work of plowing, sowing, and digging weeds, knowing that the harvest will belong to the one who has done the work. The author, who has handled the patent work for the new class of Nyloboard products from needle-punched fiber mats, offers guidance on how inventors and managers can do the preparatory work, to keep costs to a minimum and get the best possible results when they begin working with a patent attorney. These comments cover both (i) the new simplified do-it-yourself "provisional" patent applications that were created by Congress in 1995, and (ii) the conventional "utility" patents that create enforceable legal rights.en_US
dc.format.extent9392816 bytes
dc.format.extent232 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/html
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsAccess restricted to authorized Georgia Tech users only.en_US
dc.subjectEarliest possible filing dateen_US
dc.subjectPatenting new ideasen_US
dc.subjectProvisional patent applicationsen_US
dc.subjectUnited States patentsen_US
dc.titlePatents as Fences to Protect Ideas and Propertiesen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US


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