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dc.contributor.authorNemhauser, George L.
dc.date.accessioned2006-08-08T18:35:18Z
dc.date.available2006-08-08T18:35:18Z
dc.date.issued2005-10-25
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/11281
dc.descriptionPresentation given in the Wilby Room of the Georgia Tech Library and Information Center.en
dc.descriptionRuntime: 70:47 minutes
dc.description.abstractCollege and professional sports, including basketball, baseball, football and hockey, is a multi-billion dollar industry with a substantial part of the revenue derived from television. To maximize revenue, it is crucial to have important games televised on the right days and times. These requirements frequently conflict with more traditional requirements of a "fair" schedule that balances strength of schedule, home and away games, and travel. Sports scheduling can be thought of as the engineering of the sports entertainment supply chain. A typical model for a sports scheduling problem is a combinatorial design with nasty side constraints and multi-objectives. In this talk we discuss our experience with the Sports Scheduling Group in scheduling ACC basketball and football, and major league baseball.en
dc.format.extent1702259 bytes
dc.format.extent70:47 minutes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen
dc.subjectCollege sportsen
dc.subjectProfessional sportsen
dc.subjectSports schedulingen
dc.subjectSports Scheduling Groupen
dc.titleSports Schedulingen
dc.typeLectureen
dc.typeVideoen
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Library and Information Centeren_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Industrial and Systems Engineering


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