Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGane, Brian D.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-01T19:04:24Z
dc.date.available2006-09-01T19:04:24Z
dc.date.issued2006-05-26en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/11451
dc.description.abstractTwo instructional design features hypothesized to affect problem solving performance, problem format and contextual interference, were investigated. Problem format was manipulated by altering the format of worked examples to demonstrate a molar or modular solution. Contextual interference was manipulated by randomizing the order in which problem categories were studied. Participants studied worked examples from 5 complex probability categories and solved 11 novel problems. The modular problem format reduced study time and the workload during study and increased performance on the subsequent test. Greater contextual interference increased study time but had no effect on workload or test performance. Additionally, a regression analysis demonstrated that mental workload partially mediated the effect of problem format on test performance. A separate regression analysis did not demonstrate that working memory capacity moderated the effect of problem format on mental workload.en_US
dc.format.extent517803 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectCognitive skillen_US
dc.subjectContextual interference
dc.subjectLearning
dc.subjectInstructional design
dc.titleCan modular examples and contextual interference improve transfer?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.S.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.description.advisorCommittee Chair: Catrambone, Richard; Committee Member: Fisk, Arthur; Committee Member: James, Lawrenceen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record