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dc.contributor.authorRoman, John Williamen_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-02-19T20:54:59Z
dc.date.available2008-02-19T20:54:59Z
dc.date.issued2007-12-17en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/19943
dc.description.abstractThis experiment will use event-related brain potential (ERP) measures to investigate the time course of emotional expression processing across six emotions (happy, sad, anger, fear, disgust, and neutral) in young and older adults. The experiment had participants perform a gender-discrimination task irrelevant to emotion. At frontocentral electrode locations approximately 160ms post stimulus, younger adults demonstrated a greater positivity for fearful faces as compared to neutral faces. Older adults showed no such effect. When presented with emotional expressions younger adults showed early activation at pre-frontal electrodes followed by activation at more posterior electrode sites. This also contrasted with older adults, who demonstrated persistent pre-frontal activations that began around 160ms and persisted until 800ms. Older adults absence of a positivity elicited by fearful expressions relative to neutral expressions and the presence of an increased pre-frontal activation offers some support for the socio-emotional selectivity theory, which holds that older adults use cognitive emotion processes to regulate emotional stimuli.en_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectFace processingen_US
dc.subjectAgingen_US
dc.subjectEmotion regulationen_US
dc.subjectEmotionen_US
dc.subjectEvent-related potentialsen_US
dc.titleAge Related Effects of Emotions on Brain Potentialsen_US
dc.typeUndergraduate Thesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.description.advisorCommittee Member/Second Reader: Blanchard-Fields, Fredda; Faculty Mentor: Corballis, Paulen_US


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