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dc.contributor.authorTompa, Martin
dc.date.accessioned2008-02-22T18:53:43Z
dc.date.available2008-02-22T18:53:43Z
dc.date.issued2008-02-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/20067
dc.descriptionProfessor Martin Tompa of the University of Washington presented a lecture at 12 noon on February 6, 2008 in the Klaus building room 1116E on the Georgia Tech campusen_US
dc.descriptionRuntime: 58:21 minutes
dc.description.abstractThere are currently 575 bacterial species and 28 vertebrate species, ranging from primates to fishes, for which we know (nearly) their entire DNA sequences. These number will continue to increase rapidly over the next few years. Comparing these genome sequences has emerged as one of the most important areas of computational biology. For example, one way to predict functional portions of the human genome is to search among related genomes for sequences that appear to be remarkably similar due to selective pressure. I will discuss and demonstrate some of the methods and tools for such an approach, as well as some of the challenges and unsolved problems. This talk will be self-contained: no knowledge of biology beyond what you have heard in the news will be assumed.en_US
dc.format.extent58:21 minutes
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesComputational Science and Engineering Distinguished Lecture Seriesen_US
dc.subjectDNA sequences
dc.subjectFunctional portions of the human genome
dc.subjectPhylogenetic footprinting
dc.subjectSequence alignment
dc.titleWhat Can We Do with a Multitude of Genome Sequences?en_US
dc.typeLectureen_US
dc.typeVideo
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Washington


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