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dc.contributor.authorBurnham, Kaylee E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-22T17:09:07Z
dc.date.available2008-05-22T17:09:07Z
dc.date.issued2008-05-05en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/21831
dc.description.abstractAlthough the ubiquity of technology can make many aspects of life more convenient, it may simultaneously raise concerns about the privacy of personal information. While the link between privacy, self-disclosure, and new technology has been suggested, a clear understanding of these variables remains lacking. Explanation for the need for information has been suggested to increase one s comfort level and in turn lead to increased disclosure. The goal of the present study was to assess how experience with a technology affects attitudes toward levels of disclosure of personal information. Older adult (ages 65-74) and younger adult (ages 18-22) participants were exposed to one of two systems, either providing feedback or no feedback relating to the purpose of the question, designed to gather personal health information. Participants provided a rating about how much information they believed they would disclose to the system. Results indicate that younger adults alter their self-disclosure attitudes based on the sensitivity of the question asked, but older adults do not. Neither age group was affected by feedback related to the purpose of the question.en_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectPrivacyen_US
dc.subjectTechnologyen_US
dc.subjectSelf-disclosureen_US
dc.subjectHealthen_US
dc.titleThe Effects of Experience with a Technology on Privacy Concerns and Disclosure of Health Informationen_US
dc.typeUndergraduate Thesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.description.advisorCommittee Member/Second Reader: Rogers, Wendy; Faculty Mentor: Fisk, Arthuren_US


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