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dc.contributor.authorArkin, Ronald C.
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-11T16:03:28Z
dc.date.available2008-06-11T16:03:28Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/22715
dc.description.abstractThis article provides the basis, motivation, theory, and design recommendations for the implementation of an ethical control and reasoning system potentially suitable for constraining lethal actions in an autonomous robotic system so that they fall within the bounds prescribed by the Laws of War and Rules of Engagement. It is based upon extensions to existing deliberative/reactive autonomous robotic architectures, and includes recommendations for (1) post facto suppression of unethical behavior, (2) behavioral design that incorporates ethical constraints from the onset, (3) the use of affective functions as an adaptive component in the event of unethical action, and (4) a mechanism in support of identifying and advising operators regarding the ultimate responsibility for the deployment of such a system.en_US
dc.description.abstractPart 1: This paper provides the motivation and philosophy underlying the design of an ethical control and reasoning system potentially suitable for constraining lethal actions in an autonomous robotic system, so that its behavior will fall within the bounds prescribed by the Laws of War and Rules of Engagement. This research, funded by the U.S. Army Research Office is intended to ensure that robots do not behave illegally or unethically in the battlefield. Reasons are provided for the necessity of developing such a system at this time, as well as arguments for and against its creation.
dc.description.abstractPart 2: This paper, the second in a series, provides the theory and formalisms for the implementation of an ethical control and reasoning system potentially suitable for constraining lethal actions in an autonomous robotic system. so that they fall within the bounds prescribed by the Laws of War and Rules of Engagement. It is based upon extensions to existing deliberative/reactive autonomous robotic architectures.
dc.description.abstractPart 3: This paper, the third in a series, provides representational and design recommendations for the implementation of an ethical control and reasoning system potentially suitable for constraining lethal actions in an autonomous robotic system so that they fall within the bounds prescribed by the Laws of War and Rules of Engagement. It is based upon extensions to existing deliberative/reactive autonomous robotic architectures, and includes recommendations for (1) post facto suppression of unethical behavior, (2) behavioral design that incorporates ethical constraints from the onset, (3) the use of affective functions as an adaptive component in the event of unethical action, and (4) a mechanism in support of identifying and advising operators regarding the ultimate responsibility for the deployment of such a system.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectAutonomous robotsen_US
dc.subjectAutonomous systemsen_US
dc.subjectBattlefield robotsen_US
dc.subjectHuman-robot interactionen_US
dc.subjectMachine ethicsen_US
dc.subjectRobot ethicsen_US
dc.subjectUnmanned systemsen_US
dc.subjectUnmanned vehiclesen_US
dc.titleGoverning Lethal Behavior: Embedding Ethics in a Hybrid Deliberative/Reactive Robot Architectureen_US
dc.typePaperen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. College of Computing
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Mobile Robot Laboratory


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  • Mobile Robot Laboratory [187]
    Papers, pre/post-prints, and presentations by faculty and students in the Georgia Tech Mobile Robot Laboratory.
  • Mobile Robot Laboratory Publications [187]
    Papers, pre/post-prints, and presentations by faculty and students in the Georgia Tech Mobile Robot Laboratory.

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