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dc.contributor.authorCozzens, Susan E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-23T16:52:28Z
dc.date.available2008-06-23T16:52:28Z
dc.date.issued2008-01-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/23051
dc.description.abstractGlobal inequality is a changing phenomenon molded by a variety of interlocking dynamic forces. Technological change is one of these. If we picture the world system as a cross-tabulation of nation states and technological capabilities, we see a core of advanced and advancing nations, a small set of countries rapidly developing their capabilities, and a large number of countries struggling to maintain or build (Sagasti 2004). These groups correspond roughly to the economic hierarchy of nations, in which only four countries have moved into the top group in the last five decades: South Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, and Hong Kong (Milanovic 2005). It is no accident that these four are also the models constantly offered for technology-based economic development.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSchool of Public Policy Working Papers ; 30en_US
dc.subjectTechnology-based economic developmenten_US
dc.subjectEconomic hierarchyen_US
dc.subjectNational innovation systems analysisen_US
dc.subjectIncome inequality within countriesen_US
dc.titleInnovation and Inequalityen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Public Policyen_US


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