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dc.contributor.authorTirrell, David A.
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-22T19:15:47Z
dc.date.available2009-04-22T19:15:47Z
dc.date.issued2009-04-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/27737
dc.descriptionThe 24th annual Ashton Cary Lecture was presented on April 1, 2009, from 4-5 pm in room G011 of the Molecular Science and Engineering Building on the Georgia Tech Campus.en
dc.descriptionThe Cary Lecture Series
dc.descriptionRuntime: 46:56 minutes
dc.description.abstractMacromolecular chemistry has traditionally been divided into two fields, with biochemists and biochemical engineers working on proteins and nucleic acids while polymer chemists and materials scientists have concerned themselves with synthetic polymers. These two classes of macromolecules have profound differences: proteins and nucleic acids are uniform, well-folded, and evolvable, whereas polymers are heterogeneous and tend to adopt random-coil conformations. These differences in molecular structure and behavior have led to striking differences in how natural and synthetic polymers are used - largely for information storage and transfer in biology, and largely as materials in the technological world. This lecture will describe an ongoing attempt to bridge the gap between polymers and proteins by using artificial genes to direct the synthesis of artificial proteins in bacterial cells and to combine the physical and informational properties of macromolecules.en
dc.format.extent46:56 minutes
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSchool of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Seminar Seriesen_US
dc.subjectMacromolecular chemistryen
dc.subjectNucleic aciden
dc.subjectProteinsen
dc.subjectSynthetic polymersen
dc.titleProteins That Nature Never Madeen
dc.typeLectureen
dc.typeVideo
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
dc.contributor.corporatenameCalifornia Institute of Technology


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