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dc.contributor.authorVichot, Rayen_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-06-08T18:44:06Z
dc.date.available2009-06-08T18:44:06Z
dc.date.issued2009-04-08en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/28098
dc.description.abstractWhat happens when an online community moves to a real space? Take the case of Anonymous. For several years now, this, loosely connected, entirely internet based group has been known for online pranks and griefing, often being labeled by the media as "hackers on steroids" or "the Internet Hate Machine". However, recently a significant portion of the group has taken up the cause of protesting what it sees as criminal injustices of the Church of Scientology. This move into the real world sparked various discussions which are relevant for online communities as a whole. What negotiations, compromises, and changes took place in order to move into the real world space? In what ways has the group succeeded (or failed) in maintaining the momentum needed for long term real-world protest and what can other online communities gain from this history?en_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectMessage boardsen_US
dc.subjectOnline communitiesen_US
dc.subjectTactical mediaen_US
dc.subjectMemeen_US
dc.subjectEthnographyen_US
dc.subjectScientologyen_US
dc.subjectTrollingen_US
dc.subjectGriefingen_US
dc.subjectCollaborative worken_US
dc.subject.lcshCommunities of practice
dc.subject.lcshReality
dc.subject.lcshConcrete (Philosophy)
dc.subject.lcshCyberbullying
dc.title"Doing it for the lulz"?: online communities of practice and offline tactical mediaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.S.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentLiterature, Communication, and Cultureen_US
dc.description.advisorCommittee Chair: Celia Pearce; Committee Member: Carl DiSalvo; Committee Member: Fox Harrell; Committee Member: Jay Bolteren_US


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