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dc.contributor.authorNain, Delphine
dc.contributor.authorPetigara, Noshirwan
dc.contributor.authorBalakrishnan, Hari
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-24T18:41:05Z
dc.date.available2009-07-24T18:41:05Z
dc.date.issued2004-12
dc.identifier.citationDelphine Nain, Noshirwan Petigara, and Hari Balakrishnan, "Integrated Routing and Storage for Messaging Applications in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks," Mobile Networks and Applications, Vol. 9, No. 6, (December 2004) 595-604en
dc.identifier.issn1383-469X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/29239
dc.descriptionThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com: http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/B:MONE.0000042498.60917.e8en
dc.descriptionDOI: 10.1023/B:MONE.0000042498.60917.e8
dc.descriptionPresented at WiOpt'03: Modeling and Optimization in Mobile, Ad Hoc and Wireless Networks, March 3-5, 2003, INRIA Sophia-Antipolis, France.
dc.description.abstractThis paper is motivated by the observation that traditional ad hoc routing protocols are not an adequate solution for messaging applications (e.g., e-mail) in mobile ad hoc networks. Routing in ad hoc mobile networks is challenging mainly because of node mobility – the more rapid the rate of movement, the greater the fraction of bad routes and undelivered messages. For applications that can tolerate delays beyond conventional forwarding delays, we advocate a relay-based approach to be used in conjunction with traditional ad hoc routing protocols. This approach takes advantage of node mobility to disseminate messages to mobile nodes. The result is the Mobile Relay Protocol (MRP), which integrates message routing and storage in the network; the basic idea is that if a route to a destination is unavailable, a node performs a controlled local broadcast (a relay) to its immediate neighbors. In a network with sufficient mobility – precisely the situation when conventional routes are likely to be non-existent or broken – it is quite likely that one of the relay nodes to which the packet has been relayed will encounter a node that has a valid, short (conventional) route to the eventual destination, thereby increasing the likelihood that the message will be successfully delivered. Our simulation results under a variety of node movement models demonstrate that this idea can work well for applications that prefer reliability over latency.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen
dc.subjectAd-hoc mobile networksen
dc.subjectAd-hoc routingen
dc.subjectMessaging applicationsen
dc.subjectMobility modelsen
dc.titleIntegrated Routing and Storage for Messaging Applications in Mobile Ad Hoc Networksen
dc.typePost-printen
dc.contributor.corporatenameMassachusetts Institute of Technology
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. College of Computing
dc.publisher.originalSpringer Verlag


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