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dc.contributor.authorDeHeer, Christopher J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGoodisman, Michael A. D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRoss, Kenneth G.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-12-10T20:30:18Z
dc.date.available2009-12-10T20:30:18Z
dc.date.issued1999-06
dc.identifier.citationChristopher J. DeHeer, Michael A. D. Goodisman, and Kenneth G. Ross, "Queen dispersal strategies in the multiple-queen form of the fire ant Solenopsis invicta," American Naturalist (1999) 153:660-675
dc.identifier.issn0003-0147
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/31356
dc.description© 1999 University of Chicago Press. This article is available from: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/pdf/10.1086/303205en
dc.descriptionDOI: 10.1086/303205
dc.description.abstractNewly produced queens in the multiple-queen (polygyne) form of the fire ant Solenopsis invicta show dramatic variation in dispersal patterns, and this variation is influenced by genotypic variation at a single locus associated with the genetic marker Gp-9. Heavy, homozygous Gp-9BB queens exhibit the highest vagility among polygyne queens and are strongly attracted to the open, disturbed-habitat patches that characteristically attract queens of the single-queen (monogyne) form (all of which possess genotype Gp- 9BB). Intermediate weight, heterozygous Gp-9Bb queens exhibit a mixed dispersal strategy: some remain in the area near their natal nest, while others disperse to land in the same disturbed-habitat patches as Gp-9BB queens. Light, homozygous Gp-9bb queens appear to lack the energy reserves needed to take part in mating flights in substantial numbers. Most queens that disperse from their natal nest site apparently fail to infiltrate mature nests to reproduce. However, consistent with the expectations of game-theoretical models for the evolution of dispersal, the low realized success of dispersing queens does not prevent relatively large numbers of them from dispersing. Furthermore, the results presented here are consistent with the hypothesis that the reproductive syndrome that characterizes polygyny in S. invicta is largely controlled by a single locus.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen
dc.subjectAlternative reproductive strategiesen
dc.subjectDispersalen
dc.subjectSocial organizationen
dc.subjectGene flowen
dc.subjectPolygynyen
dc.subjectFire antsen
dc.titleQueen Dispersal Strategies in the Multiple-Queen Form of the Fire Ant Solenopsis invictaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Georgia. Dept. of Entomologyen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Georgia. Dept. of Geneticsen_US
dc.publisher.originalUniversity of Chicago Press
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/303205


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