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dc.contributor.authorLim, Mark Daviden_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-17T18:39:09Z
dc.date.available2010-03-17T18:39:09Z
dc.date.issued2009-10en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/32324
dc.descriptionAtlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy 2009en_US
dc.descriptionThis presentation was part of the session : Other Papersen_US
dc.descriptionThis material is presented to ensure timely dissemination of scholarly and technical work. Copyright and all rights therein are retained by authors or by other copyright holders. All persons copying this information are expected to adhere to the terms and constraints invoked by each author's copyright. In most cases, these works may not be reposted without the explicit permission of the copyright holder. ©2009 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or to reuse any copyrighted component of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE.
dc.description.abstractThe declining value of the dollar and the evolving shape of the economy are affecting the value and availability of the funds that support the development and commercialization of novel cancer technologies. This conservatism goes against the forward advance of translational science, which is beginning to show its greatest promise for the pursuit of innovation and the dissemination of emerging technologies. Cancer technology development is nearing a tipping point in which these countering trends may result in a decline of the United States' ability to encourage and foster innovation. The National Cancer Institute's Innovative Molecular Analysis Technologies (IMAT) program is attempting to address this rapidly changing environment to ensure that innovation is not stifled. Discussed is an overview of the IMAT program, identified bottlenecks for innovation, and a proposed strategy for engaging new partners to strengthen the pipeline for innovative cancer technologies.en_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesACSIP09. Other Papersen_US
dc.subjectCancer technologies
dc.subjectInnovation
dc.subjectCancer research
dc.titleStrengthening the Pipeline for Innovation in Cancer Research: The National Cancer Institute's Program for Innovative Molecular Analysis Technologiesen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameNational Cancer Institute


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