Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRogers, Juanen_US
dc.contributor.authorShapira, Philipen_US
dc.contributor.authorYoutie, Janen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-17T18:53:49Z
dc.date.available2010-03-17T18:53:49Z
dc.date.issued2009-10en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/32381
dc.descriptionAtlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy 2009en_US
dc.descriptionThis presentation was part of the session : Other Papersen_US
dc.descriptionThis material is presented to ensure timely dissemination of scholarly and technical work. Copyright and all rights therein are retained by authors or by other copyright holders. All persons copying this information are expected to adhere to the terms and constraints invoked by each author's copyright. In most cases, these works may not be reposted without the explicit permission of the copyright holder. ©2009 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or to reuse any copyrighted component of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE.
dc.description.abstractThis research examines approaches for constructing a comparison group relative to highly creative researchers in nanotechnology and human genetics in the US and Europe. Such a comparison group would be useful in identifying factors that contribute to scientific creativity in these emerging fields. Two comparison group development approaches are investigated. The first approach is based on propensity score analysis and the second is based on knowledge from the literature on scientific creativity and early career patterns. In the first approach, the log of citations over the years of activity in the domains under analysis produces a significant result, but the distribution of matches is not adequate at the middle and high ends of the scale. The second approach matches highly creative researchers in nanotechnology and human genetics with a comparison group of researchers that have the same or similar early career characteristics were considered: (1) same first year of publication (2) same subject category of the first publication, (3) similar publication volume for the first six years in the specified emerging domain. High levels of diversity among the highly creative researchers, especially those in human genetics, underscore the difficulties of constructing a comparison group to understand factors that have brought about their level of performance.en_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesACSIP09. Other Papersen_US
dc.subjectNanotechnology
dc.subjectHuman genetics
dc.subjectResearcher performance
dc.titleBlind Matching Versus Matchmaking: Comparison Group Selection for Highly Creative Researchersen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Enterprise Innovation Instituteen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Public Policyen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameManchester Institute of Innovation Researchen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record