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dc.contributor.authorKroll, Henningen_US
dc.contributor.authorMallig, Nicolaien_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-17T18:58:15Z
dc.date.available2010-03-17T18:58:15Z
dc.date.issued2009-10-02en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/32406
dc.descriptionAtlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy 2009en_US
dc.descriptionThis presentation was part of the session : Methods, Measures, and Dataen_US
dc.descriptionThis material is presented to ensure timely dissemination of scholarly and technical work. Copyright and all rights therein are retained by authors or by other copyright holders. All persons copying this information are expected to adhere to the terms and constraints invoked by each author's copyright. In most cases, these works may not be reposted without the explicit permission of the copyright holder. ©2009 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or to reuse any copyrighted component of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE.
dc.description.abstractTheory suggests that regions provide interfaces between inter-regional flows of knowledge, as much recombining of knowledge, i.e. learning, takes place at the local level. Beyond a mere confirmation of this well-known finding, this paper illustrates that such interfaces differ with regard to the degree of technological relatedness of inter-regional flows that intersect locally - and that certain knowledge flows are more likely to be combined than others. To substantiate this claim, a differentiated set of networks of knowledge exchange is empirically developed for a number of technological fields by means of patent analysis. Moreover, we point out that general framework conditions impact on the pattern of intersection between networks. Hence, we investigate technology-specific structures of inter-regional knowledge exchange in two major regions, Europe and the United States. In the US case the networks display a pattern driven by a technological logic whereas in Europe they seem to be characterized by a hierarchy of multi-field centers.en_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesACSIP09. Methods, Measures, and Dataen_US
dc.subjectPatentsen_US
dc.subjectTechnological innovation systemsen_US
dc.subjectEuropeen_US
dc.subjectUnited Statesen_US
dc.titleRegional Patterns of Co-Patenting by Technological Field, A Europe - US Comparisonen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameFraunhofer-Institut für Systemtechnik und Innovationsforschungen_US


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