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dc.contributor.authorJensen, Klavs F.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-29T21:45:19Z
dc.date.available2010-04-29T21:45:19Z
dc.date.issued2010-04-14
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/32888
dc.descriptionThe 25th annual Ashton Cary Lecture was presented on April 14, 2010 from 4-5 pm in room G011 of the Molecular Science and Engineering Building on the Georgia Tech Campus.en_US
dc.descriptionThe Cary Lecture Seriesen_US
dc.description.abstractMicrofabrication techniques have fueled spectacular advances in the electronic and telecommunications industries, and more recently, in microanalysis chips for chemical and biological applications. These systems promise to transform classical laboratory procedures into integrated systems capable of providing new understanding of fundamental chemical and biological processes as well as rapid, continuous discovery and development of new products with less use of resources and waste generation. Chemical microsystems combine microfluidic channels, chemical-synthesis-on-a chip, and microscale separation to enable multiple synthesis and separation steps, which are further enhanced by information gained from integrating miniaturized sensors and actuators. Biological studies are similarly accelerated by the integration of fluid handling, separation, and detection. Applications of chemical and biological microsystems are illustrated with case studies drawn from chemical synthesis, energy conversion, synthesis of nano structure, and cellular analysis. Advantages and challenges of implementing miniaturized chemical and biological systems are discussed, including future potentials of these technologies.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSchool of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Seminar Seriesen_US
dc.subjectIntegrated micro-flow systemsen_US
dc.subjectIntegrated mini-flow systemsen_US
dc.subjectChemical separationsen_US
dc.subjectMicrosystemsen_US
dc.subjectChemical synthesisen_US
dc.titleChemical and Biological Microsystems - What Are the Advantages of Small Systems?en_US
dc.typeLectureen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Chemical Engineeringen_US


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