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dc.contributor.authorBogost, Ian
dc.contributor.authorCrawford, Hugh
dc.contributor.authorDiSalvo, Carl
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, John
dc.contributor.authorStafford, Barbara
dc.contributor.authorThacker, Eugene
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-18T13:31:26Z
dc.date.available2010-05-18T13:31:26Z
dc.date.issued2010-04-23
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/33049
dc.descriptionPresented at the first Object-Oriented Ontology Symposium, April 23, 2010, Georgia Tech Hotel, Atlanta, Georgiaen_US
dc.descriptionPanel respondents: Hugh Crawford, Carl DiSalvo, John Johnston, Barbara Stafford and Eugene Thacker
dc.descriptionRuntime: 71:06 minutes
dc.description.abstractFor decades, scholars in the liberal arts have relinquished wonder to the natural sciences, and then swooped in ostentatiously to blame their awe on false consciousness. Science and engineering gets things wrong too, assuming that the world can only be understood by breaking it down into components. In this talk, I argue that the return to realism in metaphysics is also a return to wonder, a wonder that appreciates objects at different scales. Topics covered include cake baking, microprocessors, and STEM education, among others.en_US
dc.format.extent71:06 minutes
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesObject-Oriented Ontology Symposium
dc.subjectObject-oriented ontologyen_US
dc.subjectPhilosophyen_US
dc.subjectOntologyen_US
dc.subjectSTEMen_US
dc.subjectObjectsen_US
dc.subjectMetaphysicsen_US
dc.titleCakes, Chips, and Calculusen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.typeRecording, oralen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Literature, Communication, and Culture


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