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dc.contributor.authorStachowicz, John J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHay, Mark E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-06-15T15:59:00Z
dc.date.available2010-06-15T15:59:00Z
dc.date.issued2000-07
dc.identifier.citationJohn J. Stachowicz and Mark E. Hay, "Geographic Variation in Camouflage Specialization by a Decorator Crab," American Naturalist, 156, 59-71en_US
dc.identifier.issn0003-0147
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/34010
dc.description© 2000 The University of Chicagoen_US
dc.description.abstractIn North Carolina, the decorator crab Libinia dubia camouflages almost exclusively with the chemically noxious alga Dictyota menstrualis. By placing this alga on its carapace, the crab behaviorally sequesters the defensive chemicals of the plant and gains protection from omnivorous consumers. However, Dictyota is absent north of North Carolina, whereas Libinia occurs as far north as New England. Crabs from three northern locations where Dictyota is absent (Rhode Island, Connecticut, and New Jersey) camouflaged to match their environment, rather than selectively accumulating any one species. When D. menstrualis was offered to crabs from northern sites, they did not distinguish between it and other seaweeds for camouflage, whereas crabs from Alabama and two locations in North Carolina used D. menstrualis almost exclusively. In addition, in winter and spring, when Dictyota was seasonally absent in North Carolina, Libinia selectively camouflaged with the sun sponge Hymeniacidon heliophila, which was chemically unpalatable to local fishes. Thus, southern crabs were consistent specialists on chemically defended species for camouflage, while northern crabs were more generalized. The geographic shift in crab behavior away from specialization coincides with a reported decrease in both total predation pressure and the frequency of omnivorous consumers. These shifts in the nature and intensity of predation pressure may favor different camouflage strategies (generalist vs. specialist), contributing to the observed geographic differences in camouflage behavior.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectDecorator crabsen_US
dc.subjectGeographic comparisonen_US
dc.subjectIntraspecific variationen_US
dc.subjectLocal specializationen_US
dc.subjectPlant-herbivore interactionsen_US
dc.subjectSeaweeden_US
dc.titleGeographic Variation in Camouflage Specialization by a Decorator Craben_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Biologyen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Institute of Marine Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Connecticut. Dept. of Marine Sciencesen_US
dc.publisher.originalUniversity of Chicago Press


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