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dc.contributor.authorNitsche, Michael
dc.contributor.authorBogost, Ian
dc.contributor.authorSharp, John
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-20T13:09:05Z
dc.date.available2010-08-20T13:09:05Z
dc.date.issued2010-02-04
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/34502
dc.descriptionPresented at Art History of Games Symposium on February 4, 2010 from 6 pm to 7 pm in the High Museum of Art’s Rich Auditorium on the campus of the Woodruff Arts Center, in midtown Atlanta.en_US
dc.descriptionRuntime: 55:47 minutes
dc.descriptionIan Bogost is a video game designer, critic and researcher. He is an associate professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology and a founding partner at Persuasive Games. His research and writing consider video games as an expressive medium, and his creative practice focuses on games about social and political issues, including topics as varied as airport security, consumer debt, disaffected workers, the petroleum industry, suburban errands, pandemic flu and tort reform.He is the author of "Unit Operations: An Approach to Videogame Criticism," listed among "50 Books for Everyone in the Game Industry;" "Persuasive Games: The Expressive Power of Videogames;" and the co-author of "Racing the Beam: The Atari Video Computer System. Dr. Bogost holds a bachelor’s degree in philosophy and comparative literature from the University of Southern California and a master’s degree and Ph.D. in comparative literature from UCLA. He lives in Atlanta. Michael Nitsche is a digital media scholar and assistant professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His work deals with the various forms of space in video games, machinima, and digital performance. In 2007, he founded Digital World & Image Group to research the interconnections of physical and digital spaces. His work investigates the social spaces of the play space as well as their connection to a virtual polygon world and cinematic image. Nitsche’s book "Video Game Spaces; Image, Play, and Structure in 3D Worlds" was published by MIT Press in 2009. Together with Henry Lowood, he is co-editing "The Machinima Reader. He holds an M.A. in drama and German language from Freie University Berlin, Germany, and an M.Phil. in architecture and the moving image as well as a Ph.D. in architecture from the University of Cambridge, UK. John Sharp is an accomplished game designer, art historian and educator with over 20 years experience. His design work is focused on Twitter and social platform games, art games and non-digital games. His current research is focused on game design curricula for after-school programs, the history of play and the early history of computer and video games. Dr. Sharp is a professor in the interactive design and game development and art history departments at the Savannah College of Art and Design. He also is a member of Local No. 12, a social network game collaboration; a member of The Leisure Society, an artgame collective; and a partner in Supercosm, a digital media consultancy.
dc.description.abstractOpening remarks and a panel discussion with Ian Bogost, Michael Nitsche, and John Sharp at the Art History of Games event.en_US
dc.format.extent55:47 minutes
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesArt History of Games Symposium
dc.subjectArten_US
dc.subjectVideo gamesen_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
dc.subjectDesignen_US
dc.subjectArt history of gamesen_US
dc.subjectGame designen_US
dc.subjectFluxusen_US
dc.subjectAvant-gardeen_US
dc.subjectSporten_US
dc.titleWhat is an Art History of Games?en_US
dc.title.alternativeIntroductory remarksen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameSavannah College of Art and Design
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. College of Liberal Arts
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Literature, Communication, and Culture


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