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dc.contributor.authorBolter, J. David
dc.contributor.authorPearce, Celia
dc.contributor.authorLowood, Henry
dc.contributor.authorNitsche, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-20T18:58:41Z
dc.date.available2010-08-20T18:58:41Z
dc.date.issued2010-02-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/34506
dc.descriptionPresented at Art History of Games Symposium on February 5, 2010 at 4:30 pm in the High Museum of Art’s Rich Auditorium on the campus of the Woodruff Arts Center, in midtown Atlanta.en_US
dc.descriptionRuntime: 46:52 minutes
dc.descriptionJay David Bolter is the Wesley Chair of New Media at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He is the author of Remediation (1999), with Richard Grusin; and Windows and Mirrors (2003), with Diane Gromala. With Professor Blair MacIntyre and the AEL at Georgia Tech, he is helping to build Augmented Reality (AR) and mobile technology systems for games and to stage dramatic and narrative experiences for entertainment and informal education.
dc.descriptionCelia Pearce is a game designer, author, researcher, teacher, curator and artist, specializing in multiplayer gaming and virtual worlds, independent, art, and alternative game genres, as well as games and gender. She began designing interactive attractions and exhibitions in 1983, and has held academic appointments since 1998. Her game designs include the award-winning virtual reality attraction Virtual Adventures (for Iwerks and Evans & Sutherland) and the Purple Moon Friendship Adventure Cards for Girls. She received her Ph.D. in 2006 from SMARTLab Centre, then at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, University of the Arts London. She currently is Assistant Professor of Digital Media in the School of Literature, Communication and Culture at Georgia Tech, where she also directs the Experimental Game Lab and the Emergent Game Group. She is the author or co-author of numerous papers and book chapters, as well as The Interactive Book (Macmillan 1997) and Communities of Play: Emergent Cultures in Multiplayer Games and Virtual Worlds (MIT 2009). She has also curated new media, virtual reality, and game exhibitions and is currently Festival Chair for IndieCade, an international independent games festival and showcase series. She is a co-founder of the Ludica women’s game collective.
dc.descriptionLowood is curator for the history of science and technology collections and film and media collections at Stanford University. Lowood earned a Ph.D. at the University of California at Berkeley. Over a period of more than twenty years, he has combined interests in history, technological innovation and the history of digital games and simulations to head several long-term projects at Stanford, including How They Got Game: The History and Culture of Interactive Simulations and Videogames in the Stanford Humanities Lab, the Silicon Valley Archives in the Stanford University Libraries and the Machinima Archives and Archiving Virtual Worlds collections hosted by the Internet Archive. Dr. Lowood is leading Stanford’s work on game and virtual world preservation in the Preserving Virtual Worlds project funded by the U.S. Library of Congress. He is also the author of numerous articles and essays on the history of Silicon Valley and the development of digital game technology and culture. With Michael Nitsche, he is currently co-editing The Machinima Reader for MIT Press and has just completed guest editing a volume of IEEE Annals of the History of Computing on the history of computers and games.
dc.descriptionMichael Nitsche is a digital media scholar and assistant professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His work deals with the various forms of space in video games, machinima, and digital performance. In 2007, he founded Digital World & Image Group to research the interconnections of physical and digital spaces. His work investigates the social spaces of the play space as well as their connection to a virtual polygon world and cinematic image. Nitsche’s book “Video Game Spaces; Image, Play, and Structure in 3D Worlds” was published by MIT Press in 2009. Together with Henry Lowood, he is co-editing “The Machinima Reader.” He holds an M.A. in drama and German language from Freie University Berlin, Germany, and an M.Phil. in architecture and the moving image as well as a Ph.D. in architecture from the University of Cambridge, UK.
dc.format.extent46:52 minutes
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesArt History of Games Symposium
dc.subjectVideo gamesen_US
dc.subjectMaterialen_US
dc.subjectDigital mediaen_US
dc.subjectModdingen_US
dc.subjectVideo game genresen_US
dc.subjectPlatformsen_US
dc.titlePanel Discussion: Jay David Bolter, Celia Pearce, Henry Lowood ; Moderator, Michael Nitscheen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameSavannah College of Art and Design
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. College of Liberal Arts
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Literature, Communication, and Culture
dc.contributor.corporatenameStanford University


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