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dc.contributor.authorAlexander, Jason Philipen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-15T19:10:01Z
dc.date.available2010-09-15T19:10:01Z
dc.date.issued2010-07-09en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/34831
dc.description.abstractThe Adair Park neighborhood in southwest Atlanta was designed as a residential enclave for working class whites that has evolved to what it is today: an area primarily inhabited by low-income minorities. Many of its residents have worked to preserve the area's distinctive architectural heritage. Low housing values and vacancies have attracted affordable housing developers such as the Atlanta affiliate of Habitat for Humanity. In response to specific plans for the development of affordable housing in the area, members of Adair Park organized themselves to petition the City of Atlanta to adopt architectural standards that preserved the existing housing stock, and ensured that any new construction would be compatible with the neighborhood's architectural character. This study explores the tensions between inner-city communities and affordable housing developers in the quest for affordable and architecturally significant neighborhoods. The conclusions from this research suggest that the desire of predominately low-income neighborhoods to preserve the architecture character of historically significant neighborhoods may be firmly rooted in middle class aspirations and values. Moreover, the conclusions from this research also suggest non-profit housing developers should consider these attitudes prior to constructing affordable housing in predominately low-income neighborhoods.en_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectAffordable housingen_US
dc.subjectCommunity developmenten_US
dc.subjectLow-income neighborhoodsen_US
dc.subject.lcshNeighborhood planning
dc.subject.lcshHistoric preservation
dc.subject.lcshHistoric buildings Conservation and restoration
dc.subject.lcshHistoric districts
dc.titleConflict in Adair Park: preserving neighborhood architecture and history and building affordable housingen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.S.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentCity Planningen_US
dc.description.advisorCommittee Chair: Etienne, Harley; Committee Member: Dobbins, Michael; Committee Member: Flowers, Benjaminen_US


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