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dc.contributor.authorCohen, Jacob Arthuren_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-04T20:20:23Z
dc.date.available2011-03-04T20:20:23Z
dc.date.issued2010-10-08en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/37179
dc.description.abstractWe demonstrate four experimentally simple methods for measuring very complex ultrashort light pulses. Although each method is comprised of only a few optical elements, they permit the measurement of extremely complex pulses with time-bandwidth products greater than 65,000. First, we demonstrate an extremely simple frequency-resolved-optical gating (GRENOUILLE) device for measuring the intensity and phase of pulses up to ~20ps in length. In order to achieve the required high spectral resolution and large temporal range, it uses a few-cm-thick second harmonic-generation crystal in the shape of a pentagon. This has the additional advantage of reducing the device's total number of components to three. Secondly, we introduce a variation of spectral interferometry (SI) using a virtually imaged phased array and grating spectrometer for measuring long complex ultrashort pulses up to 80 ps in length. Next, we introduce a SI technique for measuring the complete intensity and phase of relatively long and very complex ultrashort pulses. It involves making multiple measurements using SI (in its SEA TADPOLE variation) at numerous delays, measuring many temporal pulselets within the pulse, and concatenating the resulting pulselets. Its spectral resolution is the inverse delay range--many times higher than that of the spectrometer used. The waveforms were measured with ~ fs temporal resolution over a temporal range of ~ns and had time-bandwidth products exceeding 65,000, which to our knowledge is the largest time-bandwidth product ever measured with ~fs temporal resolution. Finally, we demonstrate a single-shot measurement technique that temporally interleaves hundreds of measurements with ~fs temporal resolution. It is another variation of SI for measuring the complete intensity and phase of relatively long and complex ultrashort pulses in a single shot. It uses a grating to introduce a transverse time delay into a reference pulse which gates the unknown pulse by interfering it at the image plane of an imaging spectrometer. It provided ~125 fs temporal resolution and a temporal range of 70 ps using a low-resolution spectrometer.en_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectFrequency-resolved optical gatingen_US
dc.subjectArbitrary waveformsen_US
dc.subjectUltrashort pulseen_US
dc.subjectSecond harmonic generationen_US
dc.subjectNonlinear opticsen_US
dc.subjectChirped pulse amplificationen_US
dc.subjectChirped pulsesen_US
dc.subjectPulse measurementen_US
dc.subjectUltrashort pulse measurementen_US
dc.subjectNanosecond pulsesen_US
dc.subjectPicosecond pulsesen_US
dc.subject.lcshPicosecond pulses
dc.subject.lcshLaser pulses, Ultrashort
dc.subject.lcshElectric fields
dc.titleMeasuring the electric field of picosecond to nanosecond pulses with high spectral resolution and high temporal resolutionen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentPhysicsen_US
dc.description.advisorCommittee Member: brown, ken; Committee Member: Buck, John; Committee Member: curtis, jennifer; Committee Member: Trebino, Rick; Committee Member: Zhigang Jiangen_US


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