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dc.contributor.authorTrevor, Alexander J. B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPark, Hae Wonen_US
dc.contributor.authorHoward, Ayanna M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKemp, Charles C.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-25T19:09:42Z
dc.date.available2011-03-25T19:09:42Z
dc.date.issued2009-05
dc.identifier.citationA. Trevor, H-W Park, A. Howard, C. Kemp, “Playing with Toys: Towards Autonomous Robot Manipulation for Therapeutic Play.” IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), Kobe, Japan, May 2009, 2139-2145 .en_US
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-4244-2788-8
dc.identifier.issn1050-4729
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/38283
dc.description©2009 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other users, including reprinting/ republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted components of this work in other works.en_US
dc.descriptionPresented at the 2009 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), 12-17 May 2009, Kobe, Japan.en_US
dc.descriptionDOI: 10.1109/ROBOT.2009.5152589en_US
dc.description.abstractWhen young children play, they often manipulate toys that have been specifically designed to accommodate and stimulate their perceptual-motor skills. Robotic playmates capable of physically manipulating toys have the potential to engage children in therapeutic play and augment the beneficial interactions provided by overtaxed care givers and costly therapists. To date, assistive robots for children have almost exclusively focused on social interactions and teleoperative control. Within this paper we present progress towards the creation of robots that can engage children in manipulative play. First, we present results from a survey of popular toys for children under the age of 2 which indicates that these toys share simplified appearance properties and are designed to support a relatively small set of coarse manipulation behaviors. We then present a robotic control system that autonomously manipulates several toys by taking advantage of this consistent structure. Finally, we show results from an integrated robotic system that imitates visually observed toy playing activities and is suggestive of opportunities for robots that play with toys.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectAssistive robotsen_US
dc.subjectAutonomous robot manipulationen_US
dc.subjectRobotic control systemsen_US
dc.subjectRobotic playmatesen_US
dc.subjectSocial interactionsen_US
dc.subjectTeleoperationen_US
dc.subjectTherapeutic playen_US
dc.titlePlaying with Toys: Towards Autonomous Robot Manipulation for Therapeutic Play.en_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. College of Computingen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Electrical and Computer Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Dept. of Biomedical Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameEmory University. Dept. of Biomedical Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Center for Robotics and Intelligent Machinesen_US
dc.publisher.originalInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineersen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/ROBOT.2009.5152589


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