Each semester, the School of Physics invites a variety of speakers to come and share their exciting research with students and faculty at Georgia Tech. All students and faculty are invited.

Recent Submissions

  • Quantum Magnetism from the Iron Age to Today 

    Arovas, Daniel (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2021-04-12)
    The quantum theory of magnetism has provided many durable paradigms for quantum phases of matter, including intrinsically quantum disordered states, symmetry-protected topological phases, and quantum spin liquids. It also ...
  • How Materials Can Learn to Function 

    Liu, Andrea J. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2021-03-29)
    How does learning occur? In the context of neural networks, learning occurs via optimization, where a loss function is minimized to achieve the desired result. But physical networks such as mechanical spring networks or ...
  • Origins of Structure in Inner Planetary System 

    Murray-Clay, Ruth (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2021-03-01)
    Why do many stars host close-in chains of super-Earths? Why are eccentric gas giants found in some inner planetary systems? What determines which of these outcomes will occur around a particular star? I will present a ...
  • Machine Learning for Partial Differential Equations 

    Brenner, Michael P. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2020-11-16)
    When Newton's laws are applied in every point in space we arrive at a set of nonlinear partial differential equations describing the world. We often marvel at the complexity of the solutions, but we know very well that ...
  • Self-propelled topological defects 

    Yeomans, Julia (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2020-10-26)
    Active materials such as bacteria, molecular motors and eukaryotic cells continuously transform chemical energy taken from their surroundings to mechanical work. Dense active matter shows mesoscale turbulence, the emergence ...
  • Superconductivity: There's Plenty of Cream at the Bottom 

    Hirschfeld, Peter J. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2020-10-19)
    In 1961, Brian Pippard gave a speech at IBM called "The Cat and the Cream", in which he declared that the superconductivity field was finished, at least for "young innocents who wish to break new ground": the cream was ...
  • A Mind Over Matter: The Life and Science of Philip W. Anderson 

    Zangwill, Andrew (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2020-10-12)
    Dr. Zangwill presents a biographical survey of the life and science of Nobel Laureate Philip W. Anderson, arguably the most productive and influential theoretical physicist of the second half of the twentieth century. He ...
  • Recipe for a Habitable Planet 

    Shields, Aomawa L. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2020-09-21)
    The discovery of numerous small exoplanets has brought the search for life beyond the Solar System into sharp focus on many potentially habitable worlds where life may exist. However, many factors and processes can affect ...
  • Sloppy models, differential geometry, and why science works 

    Sethna, James P. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2020-09-28)
    Models of systems biology, climate change, ecology, complex instruments, and macroeconomics have parameters that are hard or impossible to measure directly. If we fit these unknown parameters, fiddling with them until they ...
  • Stacking atomic layers: quest for new materials and physics 

    Kim, Philip (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2020-09-14)
    Modern electronics heavily rely on the technology to confine electrons in the interface layers of semiconductors. In recent years, scientists discovered that various atomically thin van der Waals (vdW) layered materials ...
  • Revisiting and Repurposing the Double Helix 

    Ha, Taekjip (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2020-08-31)
    DNA is an iconic molecule that forms a double helical structure, providing the basis for genetic inheritance, and its physical properties have been studied for decades. In this talk, I will present evidence that sequence ...
  • Ultra-high Resolution Astronomical imaging using quantum properties of light 

    Kieda, David B. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2018-10-01)
    Ever since the first astronomical telescope observations made by Galileo (1610), optical astronomy has developed increasingly sophisticated methods for exploring the universe using only the classical (wave-description) ...
  • SETI: Any Closer to a Discovery? 

    Shostak, Seth (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2018-09-24)
    Are we alone in the universe? The scientific hunt for extraterrestrial intelligence is now well into its fifth decade, and we still haven’t discovered any cosmic company. Could all this mean that finding biology beyond ...
  • The American Physical Society Report on the Status of LGBT People in Physics 

    Atherton, Tim (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2018-04-16)
    In this talk, I’ll discuss climatic issues faced by LGBT people in Physics, informed by findings of the recent American Physical Society report on the status of LGBT people in Physics. This report was prepared for the APS ...
  • Arch and scaffold: Hilbert space and transformation theory 

    Janssen, Michel (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2018-04-02)
    In early 1927, Paul Dirac and Pascual Jordan, independently of one another, published their versions of a general formalism tying the various forms of the new quantum theory together and giving the theory’s statistical ...
  • Ion Hydration and Effective Charge 

    Pincus, Philip A. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2018-03-26)
    Ions in water are typically understood to be hydrated, i.e. the appropriate water dipolar orientations point toward the charge (which is here taken to be of spherical symmetry). Depending on the specific charge, these ...
  • Life in the Universe 

    Loeb, Abraham (Avi) (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2018-03-12)
    Is life most likely to emerge at the present cosmic time around a star like the Sun? Loeb will review the habitability throughout cosmic history from the birth of the first stars 30 million years after the Big Bang to the ...
  • Many-body Entanglement and Tensor Networks 

    Evenbly, Glen (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2018-02-12)
    Quantum many-body systems are difficult to study because the space of possible many-body states is huge: its dimension grows exponentially in the system size. However, in recent years progress in our understanding of quantum ...
  • Local temperature Ansatz: A novel quantum entanglement based approach for solving strongly correlated systems 

    Vaezi, Abolhassan (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2018-02-05)
    The exact solution to interacting quantum problems is, in general, an exponentially hard task due to the exponential growth of the Hilbert space with the system size. As a result, despite extensive research during the past ...
  • Hierarchical Self-Assembly in Liquid Crystals a Rich Menu of Basic Science and Technology from the Origin of Life to Trillion Dollar Markets 

    Clark, Noel (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2017-01-29)
    The study of liquid crystals occupies a central place in materials science, serving as a context for encountering and using a variety of exotic structural themes of molecular organization, particularly of soft matter. A ...

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