Now showing items 79-98 of 103

    • Spin Electronics: Magnetic Moments and Amorphous Semiconductors 

      Hellman, Frances (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2012-09-10)
      Spin electronics in its broadest definition is the study of systems where both the charge and the spin of the electron play a role. The term was originally intended as a new technological concept, where traditionally the ...
    • Spinor Bose-Einstein Condensates and Quantum Antiferromagnetism 

      Raman, Chandra (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2011-09-21)
      Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) have revolutionized atomic physics, a revolution which, sixteen years after their discovery, shows little sign of stopping. The attention of the quantum gases community has increasingly ...
    • Stacking atomic layers: quest for new materials and physics 

      Kim, Philip (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2020-09-14)
      Modern electronics heavily rely on the technology to confine electrons in the interface layers of semiconductors. In recent years, scientists discovered that various atomically thin van der Waals (vdW) layered materials ...
    • The Statistical Mechanics of Graphene Membranes and Ribbons 

      Nelson, David (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2015-10-12)
      Understanding deformations of macroscopic thin plates and shells has a long and rich history, culminating with the Foeppl-von Karman equations in 1904. These highly nonlinear equations are characterized by a dimensionless ...
    • Statistical mechanics of the phase transition to turbulence: zonal flows, ecological collapse and extreme value statistics 

      Goldenfeld, Nigel (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2016-04-21)
      How do fluids become turbulent as their flow velocity is increased? In recent years, careful experiments in pipes and Taylor-Couette systems have revealed that the lifetime of transient turbulent regions in a fluid appears ...
    • Structured Graphene: from Ballistic Transport to Electronics 

      de Heer, Walt A. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2013-12-02)
      The original concept of graphene electronics focused on carbon nanotube properties. Carbon nanotubes were known to be high mobility ballistic, phase coherent conductors and quantum confinement effects produced significant ...
    • Superconductivity: There's Plenty of Cream at the Bottom 

      Hirschfeld, Peter J. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2020-10-19)
      In 1961, Brian Pippard gave a speech at IBM called "The Cat and the Cream", in which he declared that the superconductivity field was finished, at least for "young innocents who wish to break new ground": the cream was ...
    • Surveying the Accelerating Universe with Supernovae 

      Jha, Saurabh W. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2012-03-05)
      In 1998 two rival teams of astronomers studying exploding white dwarf stars, called type Ia supernovae, came to the surprising conclusion that the expansion of the Universe is speeding up. This discovery of "the accelerating ...
    • Synchronization in Populations of Chemical Oscillators: Quorum Sensing, Phase Clusters and Chimeras 

      Showalter, Kenneth (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2015-11-30)
      We have studied large, heterogeneous populations of discrete chemical oscillators (~100,000) to characterize two different types of density-dependent transitions to synchronized behavior, a gradual Kuramoto synchronization ...
    • A tale of two motilities: adaptive biomechanical systems in complex, changing environments 

      Nirody, Jasmine (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2021-09-27)
      Natural environments are heterogeneous and can fluctuate with time. As such, biomechanical systems from proteins to whole organisms have developed strategies to deal with considerable spatial and temporal variability. ...
    • Testing Gravity via Lunar Laser Ranging 

      Murphy, Tom (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2013-11-11)
      Forty years ago, Apollo astronauts placed the first of several retroreflector arrays on the moon. Laser range measurements between the earth and the moon have provided some of our best tests to date of general relativity ...
    • Thin film topological insulators: where do we stand and where are we headed? 

      Oh, Seongshik (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2016-10-17)
      About a decade ago, a little after graphene was discovered, a few theoretical physicists proposed that all solids can be grouped into different classes according to their band structure topologies: depending on which group ...
    • Topological Insulator Heterostructures: Searching for Exotic Particles on a Bench Top 

      Samarth, Nitin (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2012-10-08)
      A triumph of contemporary physics is the highly successful description of the most fundamental constituents of Nature and their excitations. Recent theories of “topological insulators” [1,2] have shown that in the complex ...
    • Toward Progress for All: Statistics on the Physics Community 

      Ivie, Rachel (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2014-10-20)
      The number of physics PhDs earned in 2012 reached an all-time high of more than 1700 doctorates, and the number of physics bachelor’s degrees doubled between 1999 and 2013. However, the recession of 2008 continues to ...
    • Ultra-high Energy Cosmic Rays from Blazars 

      Dermer, Charles (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2012-12-10)
      Blazar astronomy is rapidly progressing thanks in large part to the successes of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and the ground-based gamma-ray telescopes. More than 1000 active galaxies have been detected at GeV ...
    • Ultra-high Resolution Astronomical imaging using quantum properties of light 

      Kieda, David B. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2018-10-01)
      Ever since the first astronomical telescope observations made by Galileo (1610), optical astronomy has developed increasingly sophisticated methods for exploring the universe using only the classical (wave-description) ...
    • US Fusion Research 

      Hazeltine, Richard D. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2012-08-27)
      This review of the US fusion research program has two parts. The first part (after a brief primer on fusion) surveys the plasma and fusion research issues that dominate the present US program. The second part discusses in ...
    • Using Growth and Folding to Shape Elastic Sheets 

      Santangelo, Chris (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2013-01-14)
      Despite their everyday familiarity, thin sheets (paper, plastic, fabric, etc.) display remarkable and complex behaviors that still challenge theoretical description. The intricate coupling between the geometry of surfaces ...
    • Using Mechanistic Modeling to Understand Non-Linear and Age-Dependent Effects of Genetic Factors 

      McGrath, Patrick (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2015-08-31)
      Differences in DNA sequence between two individuals or cells can cause diseases like autism and cancer. The McGrath lab is interested in understanding how changes in DNA lead to observable differences among individuals of ...
    • Vulcanized matter: Its statistics, its physics, and its statistical physics 

      Goldbart, Paul (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2011-08-24)
      As Goodyear discovered, when he first vulcanized rubber in 1839, a viscous liquid of macromolecules becomes an unusual, utterly random, solid, provided that enough chemical bonds are introduced between the molecules. Perhaps ...