Now showing items 1-20 of 81

    • Why Meissner Was Wrong (or a Classical Explanation of Flux Expulsion from Superconductors) 

      Essén, Hanno (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2011-03-16)
      The discovery by Meissner and Ochsenfeld in 1933 that the magnetic field inside a conductor is expelled when it is cooled down to become superconducting was considered very surprising at the time. Meissner wrote that this ...
    • Vulcanized matter: Its statistics, its physics, and its statistical physics 

      Goldbart, Paul (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2011-08-24)
      As Goodyear discovered, when he first vulcanized rubber in 1839, a viscous liquid of macromolecules becomes an unusual, utterly random, solid, provided that enough chemical bonds are introduced between the molecules. Perhaps ...
    • Measuring Everything You've Always Wanted to Know About a Laser Pulse 

      Trebino, Rick (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2011-09-07)
      Measuring an event in time seems to require a shorter one. As a result, the development of a technique for measuring ultrashort laser pulses "the shortest events ever created” has been particularly difficult. We have, ...
    • Spinor Bose-Einstein Condensates and Quantum Antiferromagnetism 

      Raman, Chandra (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2011-09-21)
      Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) have revolutionized atomic physics, a revolution which, sixteen years after their discovery, shows little sign of stopping. The attention of the quantum gases community has increasingly ...
    • New Exciting Approaches to Particle Scattering Amplitudes 

      Elvang, Henriette (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2011-09-28)
      Particle scattering processes at experiments such as the Large Hadron Collider at CERN are described by scattering amplitudes. In quantum field theory classes, students learn to calculate amplitudes using Feynman diagram ...
    • Gamma Ray Bursts: The High Energy Photon Emission, and Implications for Gravitational Waves, Cosmic Rays and Neutrinos 

      Meszaros, Peter (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2011-10-05)
      Gamma-ray bursts have been detected at photon energies up to tens of GeV, and there are reasons to believe that the sources emit at least up to TeV energies, via leptonic or/and hadronic mechanisms. I review some recent ...
    • What Sets the Maximum Spin Rate of Neutron Stars? 

      Wasserman, Ira (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2011-10-19)
      Neutron stars are observed to rotate as fast as 716 Hz. Astrophysicists believe that they are spun-up by accretion of matter and angular momentum in binary star systems. However, the “r-mode'' instability of rotating neutron ...
    • Networks of Neurons Create Complex Dynamics: Statistical Physics and a Simple Model for the Control of Breathing 

      Levine, Alex (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2011-11-02)
      “Cogito ergo sum.” In the physical sciences, there is a long history of thinking about thinking, going back at least as far as René Descartes’ famous pronouncement. Much more recently, a combination of neuroscientists and ...
    • Protein Association in Dilute and Crowded Solutions 

      Zhou, Huan-Xiang (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2011-11-09)
      Most biological processes are mediated by mediated by protein association, and often are under kinetic rather than thermodynamic control. We have developed the transient-complex theory for protein association, which presents ...
    • Mechanics Matters … for Biological Processes on the Nanoscale 

      Meiners, Jens-Christian (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2011-11-16)
      A cell is not just a small test tube in which biochemical reactions take place, but it also has a complex and highly dynamic mechanical structure. I will discuss the underlying physical principles that govern cellular ...
    • Cosmic Information Theory and Analysis: IT from BIT, from BITs in IT 

      Bond, J. Richard (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2011-11-30)
      We consider the Universe to be fundamentally quantum and statistical, the many-paths/many-worlds story. This lecture uses Cosmic Information Theory and Analysis, CITA, as a unifying theme to explore the vast sweep of our ...
    • The Biggest Little Molecules in Nature 

      Greene, Chris H. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2011-12-07)
      This colloquium will discuss recent theoretical predictions and experimental confirmation of two unusual classes of ultra-long-range molecules. One class involves a highly-excited Rydberg electron that manages to bind a ...
    • Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2011: Dan Shechtman and The discovery of quasicrystals 

      Berger, Claire (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2012-01-09)
      The Nobel prize in Chemistry 2011 was awarded to Dan Shechtman for his “Discovery of Quasicrystals”. This discovery published in a seminal paper in November 1984 [1] lead to the re-definition of crystalline structures. ...
    • Ion and Nanodrop Injection from Taylor Cones into Gases and Liquids 

      Fernandez de la Mora, Juan (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2012-01-30)
      When sufficiently charged, the interface between a conducting liquid and an insulator (vacuum, gas, liquid) becomes unstable and forms sharp conical tips (Taylor cones) which inject liquid into the insulator. This injection ...
    • Effective field theory and ultracold atoms 

      Braaten, Eric (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2012-02-06)
      The development of the technology for trapping atoms in the vacuum and cooling them to ultralow temperatures has opened up the exciting new field of cold atom physics. This field provides a new domain of applications for ...
    • Surveying the Accelerating Universe with Supernovae 

      Jha, Saurabh W. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2012-03-05)
      In 1998 two rival teams of astronomers studying exploding white dwarf stars, called type Ia supernovae, came to the surprising conclusion that the expansion of the Universe is speeding up. This discovery of "the accelerating ...
    • The Physics of How Viruses Make New Viruses 

      Phillips, Rob (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2012-03-12)
      The viruses that infect bacteria have a hallowed position in the development of modern biology, and once inspired Max Delbruck refer to them as "the atom of biology". Recently, these viruses have become the subject of ...
    • Cell Mechanics: The Active Polymer Networks Underlying Force Transmission in Living Cells 

      Gardel, Margaret (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2012-04-16)
      Many different types of biological cells have the capability of sensing and generating mechanical forces. These biophysical properties of cells are utilized for many different aspects of cell physiology, including cell ...
    • US Fusion Research 

      Hazeltine, Richard D. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2012-08-27)
      This review of the US fusion research program has two parts. The first part (after a brief primer on fusion) surveys the plasma and fusion research issues that dominate the present US program. The second part discusses in ...
    • Spin Electronics: Magnetic Moments and Amorphous Semiconductors 

      Hellman, Frances (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2012-09-10)
      Spin electronics in its broadest definition is the study of systems where both the charge and the spin of the electron play a role. The term was originally intended as a new technological concept, where traditionally the ...