Now showing items 1-10 of 10

    • The Biggest Little Molecules in Nature 

      Greene, Chris H. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2011-12-07)
      This colloquium will discuss recent theoretical predictions and experimental confirmation of two unusual classes of ultra-long-range molecules. One class involves a highly-excited Rydberg electron that manages to bind a ...
    • Computation with Quanta 

      Amini, Jason M. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2013-02-11)
      A quantum processor, using quantum states of light and matter, holds the promise of performing calculations and simulations that are not practical by a classical processor. Many of the key components for a quantum processor ...
    • Effective field theory and ultracold atoms 

      Braaten, Eric (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2012-02-06)
      The development of the technology for trapping atoms in the vacuum and cooling them to ultralow temperatures has opened up the exciting new field of cold atom physics. This field provides a new domain of applications for ...
    • Gamma Ray Bursts: The High Energy Photon Emission, and Implications for Gravitational Waves, Cosmic Rays and Neutrinos 

      Meszaros, Peter (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2011-10-05)
      Gamma-ray bursts have been detected at photon energies up to tens of GeV, and there are reasons to believe that the sources emit at least up to TeV energies, via leptonic or/and hadronic mechanisms. I review some recent ...
    • Ion and Nanodrop Injection from Taylor Cones into Gases and Liquids 

      Fernandez de la Mora, Juan (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2012-01-30)
      When sufficiently charged, the interface between a conducting liquid and an insulator (vacuum, gas, liquid) becomes unstable and forms sharp conical tips (Taylor cones) which inject liquid into the insulator. This injection ...
    • Mechanics Matters … for Biological Processes on the Nanoscale 

      Meiners, Jens-Christian (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2011-11-16)
      A cell is not just a small test tube in which biochemical reactions take place, but it also has a complex and highly dynamic mechanical structure. I will discuss the underlying physical principles that govern cellular ...
    • New Exciting Approaches to Particle Scattering Amplitudes 

      Elvang, Henriette (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2011-09-28)
      Particle scattering processes at experiments such as the Large Hadron Collider at CERN are described by scattering amplitudes. In quantum field theory classes, students learn to calculate amplitudes using Feynman diagram ...
    • Protein Association in Dilute and Crowded Solutions 

      Zhou, Huan-Xiang (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2011-11-09)
      Most biological processes are mediated by mediated by protein association, and often are under kinetic rather than thermodynamic control. We have developed the transient-complex theory for protein association, which presents ...
    • What Sets the Maximum Spin Rate of Neutron Stars? 

      Wasserman, Ira (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2011-10-19)
      Neutron stars are observed to rotate as fast as 716 Hz. Astrophysicists believe that they are spun-up by accretion of matter and angular momentum in binary star systems. However, the “r-mode'' instability of rotating neutron ...
    • Why Meissner Was Wrong (or a Classical Explanation of Flux Expulsion from Superconductors) 

      Essén, Hanno (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2011-03-16)
      The discovery by Meissner and Ochsenfeld in 1933 that the magnetic field inside a conductor is expelled when it is cooled down to become superconducting was considered very surprising at the time. Meissner wrote that this ...