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dc.contributor.authorBelta, Calin
dc.contributor.authorBicchi, Antonio
dc.contributor.authorEgerstedt, Magnus B.
dc.contributor.authorFrazzoli, Emilio
dc.contributor.authorKlavins, Eric
dc.contributor.authorPappas, George J.
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-18T13:45:27Z
dc.date.available2011-04-18T13:45:27Z
dc.date.issued2007-03
dc.identifier.citationC. Belta, A. Bicchi, M. Egerstedt, E. Frazzoli, E. Klavins, and G.J. Pappas. Symbolic Planning and Control of Robot Motion: State of the Art and Grand Challenges. IEEE Robotics and Automation Magazine, Vol. 14, No. 1, March 2007.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1070-9932
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/38561
dc.description(c) 2007 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other users, including reprinting/ republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted components of this work in other works.en_US
dc.descriptionDigital Object Identifier: 10.1109/MRA.2007.339624
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, different research trends that use symbolic techniques for robot motion planning and control are illustrated. As it often happens in new research areas, contributions to this topic started at about the same time by different groups with different emphasis, approaches, and notation. This article tries to describe a framework in which many of the current methods and ideas can be placed and to provide a coherent picture of what the authors want to do, what have they got so far, and what the main missing pieces are. Generally speaking, the aim of symbolic control as is envisioned in this article is to enable the usage of methods of formal logic, languages, and automata theory for solving effectively complex planning problems for robots and teams of robots. The results presented in this article can be divided in two groups: top-down approaches, whereby formal logic tools are employed on rather abstract models of robots; and bottom up approaches, whose aim is to provide means by which such abstractions are possible and effective. The two ends do not quite tie as yet, and much work remains to be done in both directions to obtain generally applicable methods. However, the prospects of symbolic control of robots are definitely promising, and the challenging nature of problems to be solved warrants for the interest of a wide community of researchers.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectMobile robotsen_US
dc.subjectSymbolic controlen_US
dc.subjectRobot motion planningen_US
dc.titleSymbolic Planning and Control of Robot Motion: State of the Art and Grand Challengesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Electrical and Computer Engineering
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Center for Robotics and Intelligent Machines
dc.contributor.corporatenameBoston University. College of Engineering
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversità di Pisa
dc.contributor.corporatenameMassachusetts Institute of Technology
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Washington
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Pennsylvania. Dept. of Electrical and Systems Engineering
dc.publisher.originalInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers


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