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dc.contributor.authorter Brake, H. J. M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBurger, J. F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHolland, H. J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMeijer, R. J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMudaliar, A. V.en_US
dc.contributor.authorZalewski, D. R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLinder, M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-09T20:04:58Z
dc.date.available2011-05-09T20:04:58Z
dc.date.issued2008-05
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-934021-02-6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/38809
dc.descriptionPresented at the 16th International Cryocooler Conference, held May 17-20, 2008 in Atlanta, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractAt the University of Twente, a 14.5 K hydrogen-based sorption cooler is under development. It can be used as a stand-alone 14.5 K cooler, or as a precooler, e.g., in combination with a 4 K heliumbased sorption cooler. The advantage of sorption coolers is the absence of moving parts and, as a result, their vibration-free operation and, potentially, a very long life. A 4.5 K helium-based sorption- cooler stage was developed and built under a previous ESA-TRP contract, and in 2008, a new ESA-sponsored project was started aimed at the development of a hydrogen cooler stage. A demonstrator cooler has been designed that is able to provide 40 mW of cooling at 14.5 K. It requires an input of 5.6 W of electric power to a sorption compressor that uses a 90 K radiator as a heat sink. The required radiator area is 1.9 m2. The compressor contains two stages consisting of cells filled with activated carbon. The cells are thermally cycled between the heat-sink level of 90 K and about 210 K, causing hydrogen to be periodically adsorbed and desorbed. As a result, hydrogen is pumped from a low-pressure buffer at 0.1 bar to a medium-pressure buffer at 4 bar, and subsequently to the high-pressure side of the cold stage at 50 bar. The flow direction in this process is controlled by passive valves. In the cold stage the working fluid is precooled by a 50 K radiator (0.1 m2). In this paper, the design of the hydrogen-based sorption cooler is discussed along with breadboard tests on system components. Tests of the effect of gravity on a cold stage running at 14.5 K are included.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCryocoolers 16. J-T and sorption cryocooler developmentsen_US
dc.subjectJ-T and sorption cryocooler developmentsen_US
dc.subjectSorption cryocoolersen_US
dc.subjectHydrogen sorption cryocoolersen_US
dc.subjectJoule-Thomson effecten_US
dc.subjectPrecoolersen_US
dc.title14.5 K Hydrogen Sorption Cooler: Design and Breadboard Testsen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversiteit Twenteen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameEuropean Space Agencyen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameEuropean Space Research and Technology Centreen_US
dc.publisher.originalICC Pressen_US


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