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dc.contributor.authorHall, Dellaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-11T19:15:10Z
dc.date.available2011-05-11T19:15:10Z
dc.date.issued2011-05-09en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/38827
dc.description.abstractWind – in Navajo language – is most commonly referred to as nilch’i. In simple terms, nilch’i may be translated as “the wind,” or as “holy wind.” But that simple translation does not capture the word’s full meaning. For the Navajo, nilch’i is considered the means of life. It represents not only a god, or holy person, but also a means of communication, the act of breathing, and every Navajo’s soul. Wind is present in virtually all aspects of Navajo culture. For this conference paper I will be focusing on three key topics: birth, the inner-wind soul, and religion. By understanding how wind fits into each of these themes, one can better understand the complexity and importance of this abstract concept of Wind – for which there is no equivalent in non-Native American Indian cultures of America. My paper will contribute a more complete grasp of the concept of Navajo Wind.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectNavajoen_US
dc.subjectWinden_US
dc.subjectNative American Indiansen_US
dc.subjectIndiansen_US
dc.subjectNative Americansen_US
dc.titleThe Navajo Concept of Winden_US
dc.typeUndergraduate Thesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentHistory, Technology, and Societyen_US
dc.description.advisorFlamming, Douglas - Faculty Mentor ; Usselman, Steven - Committee Member/Second Readeren_US


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