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dc.contributor.authorHeather C. Humphreysen_US
dc.contributor.authorBook, Wayne Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorHuggins, James D.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-17T19:51:55Z
dc.date.available2011-06-17T19:51:55Z
dc.date.issued2011-03
dc.identifier.citationHeather C. Humphreys, Wayne J. Book and James D. Huggins, "Biodynamic Feedthrough Compensation and Experimental Results Using a Backhoe," Proceedings of the 52nd National Conference on Fluid Power, Las Vegas (NV), USA, March 23 - 25, 2011.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/39181
dc.descriptionPresented at the 52nd National Conference on Fluid Power, Las Vegas, NV, USA, March 23-25, 2011.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn some operator-controlled machines, motion of the controlled machine excites motion of the human operator, which is fed back into the control device, causing unwanted input and sometimes instability; this phenomenon is termed biodynamic feedthrough. In operation of backhoes and excavators, biodynamic feedthrough causes control performance degradation. This work utilizes a previously developed advanced backhoe user interface which uses coordinated position control with haptic feedback, using a SensAble Omni six degree-of-freedom haptic display device. Backhoe user interface designers and our own experiments indicate that biodynamic feedthrough produces undesirable oscillations in output with conventionally controlled backhoes and excavators, and it is even more of a problem with this advanced user interface. Results indicate that the coordinated control provides more intuitive operation, and the haptic feedback relays meaningful information back to the user. But the biodynamic feedthrough problem must be overcome in order for this improved interface to be applicable. For the purposes of reducing model complexity, the system is limited to a single degree of freedom, using fore-aft motion only. This paper investigates what types of controller-based methods of compensation for biodynamic feedthrough are most effective in backhoe operation, and how they can be implemented and tested with human operators.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectBiodynamic feedthroughen_US
dc.subjectBackhoesen_US
dc.subjectControl performance degradationen_US
dc.subjectHaptic feedbacken_US
dc.titleBiodynamic Feedthrough Compensation and Experimental Results Using a Backhoeen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.typePre-printen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Mechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Center for Robotics and Intelligent Machinesen_US


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