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dc.contributor.authorMariño-Ramírez, Leonardoen_US
dc.contributor.authorJordan, I. Kingen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-13T21:15:04Z
dc.date.available2011-12-13T21:15:04Z
dc.date.issued2006-07-20
dc.identifier.citationMariño-Ramírez, L. and I.K. Jordan, 2006. Transposable element derived DNaseI-hypersensitive sites in the human genome. Biol. Direct 1:20en_US
dc.identifier.issn1745-6150
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/42105
dc.description© 2006 Mariño-Ramírez and Jordan; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
dc.descriptionDOI: 10.1186/1745-6150-1-20en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: Transposable elements (TEs) are abundant genomic sequences that have been found to contribute to genome evolution in unexpected ways. Here, we characterize the evolutionary and functional characteristics of TE-derived human genome regulatory sequences uncovered by the high throughput mapping of DNaseI-hypersensitive (HS) sites. Results: Human genome TEs were found to contribute substantially to HS regulatory sequences characterized in CD4+ T cells: 23% of HS sites contain TE-derived sequences. While HS sites are far more evolutionarily conserved than non HS sites in the human genome, consistent with their functional importance, TE-derived HS sites are highly divergent. Nevertheless, TE-derived HS sites were shown to be functionally relevant in terms of driving gene expression in CD4+ T cells. Genes involved in immune response are statistically over-represented among genes with TE-derived HS sites. A number of genes with both TE-derived HS sites and immune tissue related expression patterns were found to encode proteins involved in immune response such as T cell specific receptor antigens and secreted cytokines as well as proteins with clinical relevance to HIV and cancer. Genes with TE-derived HS sites have higher average levels of sequence and expression divergence between human and mouse orthologs compared to genes with non TE-derived HS sites. Conclusion: The results reported here support the notion that TEs provide a specific genomewide mechanism for generating functionally relevant gene regulatory divergence between evolutionary lineages.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectTransposable elementsen_US
dc.subjectTEsen_US
dc.subjectGenome evolutionen_US
dc.subjectGene regulatory divergenceen_US
dc.titleTransposable element derived DNaseI-hypersensitive sites in the human genomeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Biologyen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameNational Institutes of Health (U.S.)en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameNational Center for Biotechnology Information (U.S.)en_US
dc.publisher.originalBioMed Centralen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1745-6150-1-20


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