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dc.contributor.authorTrue, Aaron Conwayen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-17T19:25:33Z
dc.date.available2012-02-17T19:25:33Z
dc.date.issued2011-11-16en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/42925
dc.description.abstractRegions containing gradients of vertical flow are often associated with sharp changes in hydrographic and biochemical water properties in coastal marine ecosystems. Often these are sites of dense plankton aggregations of critical ecological importance. In this study, a recirculating flume apparatus with a laminar, planar free jet (the Bickley jet) was used to create finescale gradients of fluid velocity (shear) in both upwelling and downwelling configurations for zooplankton behavioral assays. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to fully resolve the velocity fields allowing us to fine-tune experimental parameters to match fluid mechanical conditions commonly measured in the field. Zooplankton behavioral assays with two tropical calanoid copepods, Acartia negligens and Clausocalanus furcatus, an estuarine mysid, Neomysis americana, and the larvae of an estuarine mud crab, Panopeus herbstii, were conducted in control (stagnant), upwelling, and downwelling flow configurations. Statistical analyses (ANOVA) of individual zooplankton trajectories revealed the potential for individual behavioral responses to persistent finescale vertical shear layers to produce population scale aggregations, which is proposed here as a mechanism of patchiness in coastal marine ecosystems. Results from behavioral analyses reveal species-specific threshold shear strain rates that trigger individual behavioral responses. Furthermore, results show statistically significant changes in behavior (relative swimming speed, turn frequency, heading) for all species tested in response to a coherent shear structure in the form of finescale upwelling and downwelling jets. The results show that changes in individual behavior can increase Proportional Residence Time (PRT = percent time spent in the jet structure). On a population scale, the increase in PRT can lead to dense aggregations around persistent flow features, which is consistent with numerous field studies. These dense, patchy aggregations of zooplankton have profound trickle-up ecological consequences in coastal marine ecosystems.en_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectZooplankton behavioren_US
dc.subjectMarine ecologyen_US
dc.subjectParticle image velocimetryen_US
dc.subjectBickley free jeten_US
dc.subject.lcshAquatic ecology
dc.subject.lcshZooplankton
dc.subject.lcshShear flow
dc.subject.lcshFluid dynamics
dc.titlePatchiness: zooplankton behavior in finescale vertical shear layersen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeMSen_US
dc.contributor.departmentCivil and Environmental Engineeringen_US
dc.description.advisorCommittee Chair: Webster, Donald; Committee Member: Weissburg, Marc; Committee Member: Yen, Jeannetteen_US


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