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dc.contributor.authorWagner, Alan R.
dc.contributor.authorArkin, Ronald C.
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-05T19:55:21Z
dc.date.available2012-04-05T19:55:21Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/43203
dc.description.abstractDeception is utilized by a variety of intelligent systems ranging from insects to human beings. It has been argued that the use of deception is an indicator of theory of mind [2] and of social intelligence [4]. We use interdependence theory and game theory to explore the phenomena of deception from the perspective of robotics, and to develop an algorithm which allows an artificially intelligent system to determine if deception is warranted in a social situation. Using techniques introduced in [1], we present an algorithm that bases a robot’s deceptive action selection on its model of the individual it’s attempting to deceive. Simulation and robot experiments using these algorithms which investigate the nature of deception itself are discussed.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectDeceptionen_US
dc.subjectGame theoryen_US
dc.subjectHide-and-seeken_US
dc.subjectInteractionen_US
dc.subjectInterdependence theoryen_US
dc.subjectTheory of minden_US
dc.titleActing Deceptively: Providing Robots with the Capacity for Deceptionen_US
dc.typePaperen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. College of Computing
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Mobile Robot Laboratory
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Tech Research Institute


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  • Mobile Robot Laboratory Publications [174]
    Papers, pre/post-prints, and presentations by faculty and students in the Georgia Tech Mobile Robot Laboratory.
  • Mobile Robot Laboratory [175]
    Papers, pre/post-prints, and presentations by faculty and students in the Georgia Tech Mobile Robot Laboratory.

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