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dc.contributor.authorBrown, Marilyn A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSovacool, Benjamin K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCurry, Judithen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcGrath, Robert T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNorton, Bryanen_US
dc.contributor.authorOrlando, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.authorDeitchman, Benjaminen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-13T17:20:02Z
dc.date.available2012-04-13T17:20:02Z
dc.date.issued2011-11-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/43270
dc.descriptionPresented on November 11, 2011, from 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm at the Bill Moore Student Success Center, Hall of Success.en_US
dc.descriptionIntroductions by Benjamin Deitchman, president of the Public Policy Graduate Student Association.en_US
dc.descriptionRuntime: 79:16 minutes.en_US
dc.description.abstractFour faculty at Georgia Tech participated in a debate focusing on the theses of the newly published textbook (Climate Change and Global Energy Security) coauthored by Marilyn Brown (Georgia Tech) and Benjamin Sovacool (Vermont Law School). The book submits that our world already has most of the sustainable energy technologies it needs to do this, but it faces a system of reinforcing barriers that support incumbent technologies, handicap innovation, and prevent change.en_US
dc.description.abstractTackling climate change and improving energy security are two of the twenty-first century's greatest challenges. In this book, Marilyn Brown and Benjamin Sovacool offer detailed assessments of the most advanced commercially available technologies for strengthening global energy security, mitigating the effects of climate change, and enhancing resilience through adaptation and geo-engineering. They also evaluate the barriers to the deployment of these technologies and critically review public policy options crucial to their adoption.Arguing that society has most of the technologies necessary for the task, Brown and Sovacool discuss an array of options available today. They offer 8 case studies from around the world that document successful approaches to reducing emissions of greenhouse gases and improving energy security. Brown and Sovacool argue that meeting the twin challenges of climate change and energy security will allow us to provide energy, maintain economic growth, and preserve the natural environment–without forcing tradeoffs among them.en_US
dc.format.extent79:16 minutes
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectClimate changeen_US
dc.subjectEnergy securityen_US
dc.subjectEnergy sustainabilityen_US
dc.subjectClimate and energy policyen_US
dc.titleClimate Change and Global Energy Security: Debate and Book Signingen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Public Policyen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameVermont Law Schoolen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Tech Research Instituteen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Energy Research Programen_US


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