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dc.contributor.authorHouser, James B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHoogenboom, Gerriten_US
dc.contributor.authorHook, James E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Daniel L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, Kerry A.en_US
dc.contributor.editorHatcher, Kathryn J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-05T12:45:35Z
dc.date.available2012-06-05T12:45:35Z
dc.date.issued2001-03
dc.identifier.isbn0-935835-07-5
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/43556
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 2001 Georgia Water Resources Conference, April 26 and 27, 2001, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Agricultural Water: Potential Use and Management Program in Georgia program (Ag. Water Pumping) began instrumenting and collecting agricultural water use data in 1999. As of October 2000, at least 407 permitted agricultural withdrawals, and more than 600 individual sites are in the monitoring program across the state of Georgia. This represents, however, just a small subset of the more than 19,000 permitted sites in the state. In order to scale-up this subset to represent an estimate of total statewide agricultural irrigation water, the already collected data of the Ag Water Pumping project were used to estimate monthly average use amounts per crop type. Then, based on agricultural statistics data, the total amount of irrigated acreage for each crop in the state was estimated. These two sets of estimates were combined to project the total amount of agricultural irrigation water for the whole state. An initial rough estimate, based on permit numbers of agricultural irrigators who have the capacity to pump or withdraw 4.4 1/sec (100,000 gallons/day) from either surface or ground water, showed that if there are 22,000 such sites in the state then water use would be 330,000 M gallons/year for the whole state or 1,012,425 Acre- ft/year. The value arrived at using the actually measured Ag Water Pumping subset and scaling up was 489,000 M gallons/year or 1,501,457 Acre-ft/year. It is encouraging that this initial analysis to scale-up refined data has given a total state water use amount which is not radically different from the extremely gross estimate based on the number of permits and their allotted flow rates. Further analysis and additional data are needed to provide a legitimate estimate of agricultural water use in the state of Georgia.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored and Organized by: U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Natural Resources Conservation Service, The University of Georgia, Georgia State University, Georgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by the Institute of Ecology, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2202. The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of The University of Georgia, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Georgia Water Research Institute as authorized by the Water Resources Research Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-397) or the other conference sponsors.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI2001. ACF Water Issuesen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectAgricultureen_US
dc.subjectIrrigationen_US
dc.subjectWater useen_US
dc.subjectSurface wateren_US
dc.subjectGroundwateren_US
dc.titleUsing a Small Sub-sample to Project State-wide Agricultural Irrigation Water Use in 2000en_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Georgia. Dept. of Biological and Agricultural Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameNational Environmentally Sound Production Agriculture Laboratory (U.S.)en_US
dc.publisher.originalInstitute of Ecologyen_US


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