Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDeVivo, Joseph C.
dc.contributor.authorFrick, Elizabeth A.
dc.contributor.authorHippe, Daniel J.
dc.contributor.authorBuell, Gary R.
dc.contributor.editorHatcher, Kathryn J.
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-10T01:14:58Z
dc.date.available2012-06-10T01:14:58Z
dc.date.issued1995-04
dc.identifier.isbn0-935835-04-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/43850
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 1995 Georgia Water Resources Conference, April 11 and 12, 1995, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractHistoric effluent discharge and water-quality data analyses from six wastewater-treatment facilities (WWTF) in Metropolitan Atlanta indicated that the phosphorus load discharged to the Chattahoochee River decreased by about 83 percent during the period 1988-93 because of legislated restrictions on the use of phosphate detergents and improved efficiencies of phosphorus removal within WWTF. The U.S. Geological Survey recently compiled influent data for two Cobb County WWTF. These data, when compared to effluent data, are used as an example of percent phosphorus removal attributed to the legislated restrictions and improved efficiencies within the WWTF. Even though the volume of water treated by the two WWTF increased because of population growth, phosphorus concentrations and loads discharged from the WWTF decreased by 91-94 percent. About 55 percent of the decrease in phosphorus concentration, and 31-33 percent of the phosphorus load occurred in the influent and was attributed to the legislated restrictions on use of phosphate detergents. The remaining decrease in phosphorus concentrations and loads occurred in the WWTF and was attributed to improved efficiencies in treatment processes.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored and Organized by: U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Georgia State University, Georgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 with partial funding provided by the U.S. Department of Interior, Geological Survey, through the Georgia Water Research Institute as authorized by the Water Resources Research Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-397). The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of the University of Georgia or the U.S. Geological Survey or the conference sponsors.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI1995. Basin-Wide Water Managementen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectWater quality assessmenten_US
dc.subjectWater quality improvementsen_US
dc.titleNational Water-Quality Assessment Program: Effect Of Restricted Phosphate Detergent Use And Mandated Upgrades At Two Wastewater-Treatment Facilities On Water Quality, Metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, 1988-93en_US
dc.title.alternativeEffect of Restricted Phosphate Detergent Use and Mandated Upgrades at Two Wastewater Treatment Facilities on Water Quality, Metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, 1988-1993
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Georgia. Institute of Ecology
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeological Survey (U.S.)
dc.publisher.originalCarl Vinson Institute of Government


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record