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dc.contributor.authorGarza, Carlos, Jr.
dc.contributor.editorHatcher, Kathryn J.
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-11T00:18:18Z
dc.date.available2012-06-11T00:18:18Z
dc.date.issued1995-04
dc.identifier.isbn0-935835-04-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/43865
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 1995 Georgia Water Resources Conference, April 11 and 12, 1995, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe year 1994 was an enigma of sorts as far as tropical activity is concerned. While the summer season yielded only three hurricanes, several tropical systems were spawned that produced disastrous results over the southeastern part of the U.S. Tropical Storm Alberto will go down in history as a system that was considered a "weak" tropical storm. However, it was "very strong" as far as floodproducers go. More than 16 inches of rain were experienced over a large area in south Georgia. And there were small areas that received storm totals of well over 25 inches of rain (for example, Americas, Georgia recorded a storm total of nearly 27 inches). When all was said and done, one third of Georgia and about one-sixth of Alabama received over 7 inches of rain from Alberto. The meteorological conditions surrounding Alberto were not unusual. However, as the storm approached land, minor changes in the upper atmosphere caused the system to move more slowly, and even reverse its course, before eventually moving completely out of the southeast. The path of the storm, the basins traversed, and the wetness of the area before the storm, all acted together to contribute to one of the largest floods in Georgia history. Northwest Florida and southeast Alabama also experienced similar flooding conditions. Because of the magnitude of Alberto's devastation in southeast, it will be many years before a complete analysis is done. However, this presentation should serve to provide food for thought while giving an overview of the event.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored and Organized by: U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Georgia State University, Georgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 with partial funding provided by the U.S. Department of Interior, Geological Survey, through the Georgia Water Research Institute as authorized by the Water Resources Research Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-397). The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of the University of Georgia or the U.S. Geological Survey or the conference sponsors.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI1995. Water Quantityen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectStormwateren_US
dc.titleAlberto: A Hydrometeorological Nightmareen_US
dc.title.alternativeAlberto: A Meteorological Nightmare
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUnited States. National Weather Service
dc.publisher.originalCarl Vinson Institute of Government


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