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dc.contributor.authorGeorgakakos, Aristidis Peteren_US
dc.contributor.authorYao, Huamingen_US
dc.contributor.authorYu, Yongqingen_US
dc.contributor.editorHatcher, Kathryn J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-11T00:40:48Z
dc.date.available2012-06-11T00:40:48Z
dc.date.issued1995-04
dc.identifier.isbn0-935835-04-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/43866
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 1995 Georgia Water Resources Conference, April 11 and 12, 1995, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn North America, hydropower provides a significant portion of the electrical capacity, ranging from about 60 percent in Canada, to more than 30 percent in Mexico, to about 13 percent in the U.S. (North America Hydroelectric Research and Development Forum, 1992). Among the attractive features of hydropower is that it is renewable, clean, efficient, economical., and domestically produced. In the U.S., the amount of hydroelectric production is equivalent to nearly 500 million barrels of oil annually, which, at today's oil prices, have a value of $9 billion. In addition to meeting electricity demands, hydropower facilities play a critical role in water management, helping to provide flood control and water for irrigation, municipal and industrial uses, navigation, recreation, and fish and wildlife preservation. Improving the way projects are operated is a top research need. It is worth noting that a 1 percent increase in the efficiency of existing hydro plants in the U.S. would provide an additional 3 billion kilowatt-hours of electricity annually, saving the equivalent of 1.4 million tons of coal or 4.9 million barrels of oil (North American Hydroelectric Research and Development Forum, 1992). The primary motivations for this research work are (1) to demonstrate that modem optimization methods can effectively optimize the utilization of hydropower facilities and (2) compare the relative performance of optimization and the more traditional simulation models. In this article, we take up the first task and describe the problems addressed, the models developed, and the results obtained. The second task will be the subject of a panel discussion.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored and Organized by: U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Georgia State University, Georgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 with partial funding provided by the U.S. Department of Interior, Geological Survey, through the Georgia Water Research Institute as authorized by the Water Resources Research Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-397). The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of the University of Georgia or the U.S. Geological Survey or the conference sponsors.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI1995. Water Quantityen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectHydropoweren_US
dc.subjectWater utilitiesen_US
dc.subjectHydroelectric poweren_US
dc.titleA Control Model for Hydropower Systems Analysis and Operationen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Civil and Environmental Engineeringen_US
dc.publisher.originalCarl Vinson Institute of Governmenten_US


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