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dc.contributor.authorKukier, Urszulaen_US
dc.contributor.authorIshak, Che Fauziahen_US
dc.contributor.authorSumner, Malcolm E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMiller, William P.en_US
dc.contributor.editorHatcher, Kathryn J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-17T18:04:58Z
dc.date.available2012-06-17T18:04:58Z
dc.date.issued1995-04
dc.identifier.isbn0-935835-04-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/44006
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 1995 Georgia Water Resources Conference, April 11 and 12, 1995, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractCombustion of coal in the generation of electric power produces large quantities of waste ash that is typically landfilled or stockpiled on site. This material may be applied to agricultural land, thereby avoiding disposal costs, if no adverse environmental consequences result. Several trace elements such as arsenic, boron, and selenium have been found in high concentrations in some fly ashes. In this study, fly ash and a desulfurization gypsum byproduct produced by power plants were applied to two soils in the field at rates of 20 int/ ha, both singly and in mixture. Soybean followed by corn was grown on the plots, and soils sampled with depth at the end of the second season and analyzed for extractable arsenic (As). Arsenic was found to be quite immobile in both soils studied as assayed by acid extraction, although more mobile in the sandier Lakeland than in the Cecil soil. Extractable As in Cecil soil was not different on amended plots vs. controls due to the high pesticide-derived As levels. In sandier Tifton soils, fly ash tended to increase extractable As in topsoils above control levels, but low levels (< 100 ppb) were found below 50 cm depth. Desulfurization gypsum added much less As to soils than did fly ash. We conclude that on very sandy soils, some increase in As availability and leaching potential may occur with high loadings of fly ash materials; plant uptake studies are underway to assess the magnitude of this effect.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored and Organized by: U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Georgia State University, Georgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 with partial funding provided by the U.S. Department of Interior, Geological Survey, through the Georgia Water Research Institute as authorized by the Water Resources Research Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-397). The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of the University of Georgia or the U.S. Geological Survey or the conference sponsors.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI1995. Public Involvementen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectWater chemistry analysisen_US
dc.subjectWater qualityen_US
dc.titleArsenic Distribution In Soil Profiles Amended With Coal Combustion By-Productsen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Georgia. Dept. of Crop and Soil Sciencesen_US
dc.publisher.originalCarl Vinson Institute of Governmenten_US


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