Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Philip J. W.en_US
dc.contributor.editorHatcher, Kathryn J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-20T18:59:46Z
dc.date.available2012-06-20T18:59:46Z
dc.date.issued1995-04
dc.identifier.isbn0-935835-04-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/44046
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 1995 Georgia Water Resources Conference, April 11 and 12, 1995, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractDischarges into highly unsteady flows, such as tidal waters, create special problems for assessing their environmental impact and compliance with mixing zone regulations. Exposures to toxic materials at the edges of the mixing zone are highly intermittent, and time series of contaminant concentrations would be expected to contain extended periods of zeros. The time-average value of such a time series is likely to have little ecological significance, despite the use of time-averaged values in regulatory requirements. At the same time that environmental regulations have become increasingly strict, the capability and instrumentation for measurement of physical parameters in coastal and estuarine waters has increased dramatically. This has placed new demands on the abilities of mathematical models to use these data to predict the behavior of discharged substances. In this paper, we present the results of detailed modeling of the behavior of sewage discharged into coastal waters. The models use data measured from Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs) and thermistor strings directly. The ADCPs measure water velocity over the whole water column, and the thermistor strings measure temperature, and hence density, over the water column. These instruments provide vastly more data than has been previously possible. The data are used to compute environmental exposures around the outfall, including the "visitation frequency" of the plume at any location.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored and Organized by: U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Georgia State University, Georgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 with partial funding provided by the U.S. Department of Interior, Geological Survey, through the Georgia Water Research Institute as authorized by the Water Resources Research Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-397). The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of the University of Georgia or the U.S. Geological Survey or the conference sponsors.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI1995. Water Quality Managementen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectWater qualityen_US
dc.subjectWater pollutionen_US
dc.titleModeling Point Source Discharges in Tidal Watersen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Civil and Environmental Engineeringen_US
dc.publisher.originalCarl Vinson Institute of Governmenten_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record