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dc.contributor.authorRogers, Lewis F.
dc.contributor.authorSemerjian, Christopher J.
dc.contributor.authorVick, Donald A.
dc.contributor.editorHatcher, Kathryn J.
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-22T02:03:08Z
dc.date.available2012-06-22T02:03:08Z
dc.date.issued1995-04
dc.identifier.isbn0-935835-04-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/44055
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 1995 Georgia Water Resources Conference, April 11 and 12, 1995, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractResource grade GPS receivers are being used to determine the positional indices for wells and associated potential pollution sources for public wells in Georgia. This study was conducted to evaluate the accuracy and precision of the applied technology and techniques. Sixty differentially- corrected GPS positions were calculated at a 1st order monument located 257 miles from the GPS Base Station. The horizontal mean radial error for these tests was 7.8 ft. The RMSE was 9.6 ft. and 98% of all calculated positions fell within 19.2 ft. of the true positions. Elevation errors were about 1.5 times greater than those for horizontal positions. These tests were conducted under ideal conditions. Traditional surveying is used to determine bearing and distances between wells and associated potential pollution sources. A bearing/distance is then shot to a GPS location that is clear of obstruction. The Geographic Calculator is then used to translate distances and bearing from station to station for positional indices. This technique maximizes the accuracy of both horizontal and vertical positional data.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored and Organized by: U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Georgia State University, Georgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 with partial funding provided by the U.S. Department of Interior, Geological Survey, through the Georgia Water Research Institute as authorized by the Water Resources Research Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-397). The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of the University of Georgia or the U.S. Geological Survey or the conference sponsors.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI1995. Water Quality Managementen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectWater quality assessmenten_US
dc.subjectWater pollutionen_US
dc.subjectWater resources researchen_US
dc.subjectWater quality data
dc.titleG.P.S. Applications in Support of the Georgia Environmental Protection Division's Drinking Water Programen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGainesville College (1988-2005)
dc.publisher.originalCarl Vinson Institute of Government


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