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dc.contributor.authorUrban, Richard D.
dc.contributor.editorHatcher, Kathryn J.
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-24T01:55:25Z
dc.date.available2012-06-24T01:55:25Z
dc.date.issued1995-04
dc.identifier.isbn0-935835-04-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/44075
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 1995 Georgia Water Resources Conference, April 11 and 12, 1995, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe water resources of a region are renewable, but (mite. Thus, regional water resources are limited as to the uses they can support. That is, with respect to these uses, they have a "carrying capacity." If this carrying capacity is exceeded, the system ceases to be "sustainable." The carrying capacity for a region is dependent upon the mix of uses that are present or that could be present. Determination of this mix of uses for a sustainable future must consider the interrelationships that exist between the physical, ecological, societal, economic, and institutional sectors. This mix also is contingent upon that vision of the future on which the region's stakeholders can agree. So long as this future's regional water resources demands are less than the carrying capacity of these same resources, it is, potentially, a sustainable future. Demands so defined, then, can be used as the basis for a sustainable water resources management effort. This in turn requires initiating the process of deciding what actions are needed to assure that this mix of uses is realized and that future generations are bequeathed a system in balance. The success of this process is made more likely by the implementation of a Decision Support System. This system, which represents a long-term commitment by those who lay claim to their share of the region's future, is useful in tacking progress, identifying emerging issues or concerns, providing a forum for problem solving, and continuing the critical process of data collection. All these actions are of great importance in developing a sustainable water resources management plan for a region. In the end, however, the assurance that the plan's goals and objectives are achieved is dependent upon the critical linkage between the plan and its implementation, a linkage that can be forged and maintained only by determined, politically engaged stakeholders.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored and Organized by: U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Georgia State University, Georgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 with partial funding provided by the U.S. Department of Interior, Geological Survey, through the Georgia Water Research Institute as authorized by the Water Resources Research Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-397). The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of the University of Georgia or the U.S. Geological Survey or the conference sponsors.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI1995. Basin-Wide Water Managementen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectWater supply
dc.subjectWatersheds research
dc.titleSustainable Water Managementen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameTennessee Valley Authority
dc.publisher.originalCarl Vinson Institute of Government


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