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dc.contributor.authorWilhite, Donald A.
dc.contributor.editorHatcher, Kathryn J.
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-24T02:24:46Z
dc.date.available2012-06-24T02:24:46Z
dc.date.issued1995-04
dc.identifier.isbn0-935835-04-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/44077
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 1995 Georgia Water Resources Conference, April 11 and 12, 1995, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe term "sustainable development" is usually credited to the 1987 report of the World Commission On Environment And Development, entitled Our Common Future. To achieve the changes in human actions judged necessary to restore and preserve the planet's environment, the Commission recommended the development of a United Nations' program on sustainable development. The discussions and recommendations concerning this program provided the impetus for the United Nations' Conference on Environment and Development, held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in June, 1992. Debate at this conference focused on, among other things, world environmental and development issues related to climate change and sustainability. Since this conference, many nations have pursued the concept of sustainable development through entities appointed to formulate a process to define a sustainable future. In the U.S., this approach has taken the form of the President's Council on Sustainable Development, created in 1992 by President Clinton. Since 1988, pursuant to a bilateral agreement between the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Environment Canada, the United States and Canada have jointly sponsored a series of five symposia on the implications of climate change. These meetings have focused on regions of mutual interest such as the Great Lakes, Great Plains, and the Pacific Northwest. This series continues in May, 1995, with a much broader focus: sustainable development in the context of global environmental change. The latest symposium, Planning for a Sustainable Future: The Case of the North American Great Plains, will emphasize a region that represents a critical environmental zone, where the impacts of climate change are likely to be more severe and to materialize more rapidly than in less fragile ecosystems. This symposium, the rationale for it, its planning, implementation and intended results, will be discussed as a model process by which a region can begin defining its sustainable future.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored and Organized by: U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Georgia State University, Georgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 with partial funding provided by the U.S. Department of Interior, Geological Survey, through the Georgia Water Research Institute as authorized by the Water Resources Research Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-397). The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of the University of Georgia or the U.S. Geological Survey or the conference sponsors.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI1995. Basin-Wide Water Managementen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectSustainable developmenten_US
dc.subjectWatersheds researchen_US
dc.titleSustainable Development: A Challenge for the 21st Centuryen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Nebraska--Lincoln. International Drought Information Center
dc.publisher.originalCarl Vinson Institute of Government


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