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dc.contributor.authorBaughman, Douglas S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHorton, Mary E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMerritt, Timen_US
dc.contributor.authorRivers, Robert R.en_US
dc.contributor.editorHatcher, Kathryn J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T18:58:14Z
dc.date.available2012-06-26T18:58:14Z
dc.date.issued2001-03
dc.identifier.isbn0-935835-07-5
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/44104
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 2001 Georgia Water Resources Conference, April 26 and 27, 2001, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn March 2000, the City of Gainesville and Hall County, in cooperation with Forsyth County, completed the Community Watershed Assessment. The project outlined recommendations for improving or maintaining the water quality and biotic integrity of the tributaries entering Lake Lanier, as well as the tributaries to the North Oconee and Etowah Rivers. The three governments have continued to cooperate during the implementation phase. Hall County and the City of Gainesville have been working closely to ensure consistency in watershed management and efficiency in implementing the plan. The watershed management plan included recommendations for additional storm water controls, stream buffers, and increased enforcement of sedimentation and erosion control measures. Implementation of the watershed management plan required programmatic changes in existing municipal policies, potential organizational changes, and ordinance revisions. Hall County has developed a single watershed protection ordinance to incorporate many of the requirements for watershed management, including storm water quality and quantity controls, an approach for managing new development, and a requirement for stream buffers. The City of Gainesville has taken a similar approach and is revising the municipal code to incorporate these requirements. In addition, the City and Hall County have developed an integrated watershed monitoring program that includes both water quality and biological monitoring, stream walks to identify potential water quality and habitat degradation, and an adopt-a-stream program to solicit public participation.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored and Organized by: U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Natural Resources Conservation Service, The University of Georgia, Georgia State University, Georgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by the Institute of Ecology, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2202. The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of The University of Georgia, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Georgia Water Research Institute as authorized by the Water Resources Research Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-397) or the other conference sponsors.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI2001. Water Qualityen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectWatershedsen_US
dc.subjectWatershed managementen_US
dc.subjectWater qualityen_US
dc.subjectBiotic integrityen_US
dc.subjectWatershed protectionen_US
dc.subjectWater quality protectionen_US
dc.titleWatershed Management for Lake Lanier: Perspectives on Inter-governmental Implementationen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGainesville (Ga.)en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameHall County (Ga.). Dept. of Public Utilitiesen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameCH2M HILL (Firm)en_US
dc.publisher.originalInstitute of Ecologyen_US


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