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dc.contributor.authorEdmonson, Peter J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHunt, William D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStubbs, Desmond D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Sang-Hunen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-05T20:56:05Z
dc.date.available2012-11-05T20:56:05Z
dc.date.issued2008-02
dc.identifier.citationEdmonson, Peter J. and Hunt, William D. and Stubbs, Desmond D. and Lee, Sang-Hun, "Analogies between digital radio and chemical orthogonality as a method for enhanced analysis of molecular recognition events," International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 9, 2, 154-168 (February 2008)en_US
dc.identifier.issn1422-0067
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/45241
dc.description© 2008 MDPI. Reproduction is permitted for noncommercial purposes.en_US
dc.descriptionThe definitive version of this paper is available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms9020154en_US
dc.descriptionDOI: 10.3390/ijms9020154en_US
dc.description.abstractAcoustic wave biosensors are a real-time, label-free biosensor technology, which have been exploited for the detection of proteins and cells. One of the conventional biosensor approaches involves the immobilization of a monolayer of antibodies onto the surface of the acoustic wave device for the detection of a specific analyte. The method described within includes at least two immobilizations of two different antibodies onto the surfaces of two separate acoustic wave devices for the detection of several analogous analytes. The chemical specificity of the molecular recognition event is achieved by virtue of the extremely high (nM to pM) binding affinity between the antibody and its antigen. In a standard ELISA (Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay) test, there are multiple steps and the end result is a measure of what is bound so tightly that it does not wash away easily. The fact that this "gold standard" is very much not real time, masks the dance that is the molecular recognition event. X-Ray Crystallographer, Ian Wilson, demonstrated more than a decade ago that antibodies undergo conformational change during a binding event[1, 2]. Further, it is known in the arena of immunochemistry that some antibodies exhibit significant cross-reactivity and this is widely termed antibody promiscuity. A third piece of the puzzle that we will exploit in our system of acoustic wave biosensors is the notion of chemical orthogonality. These three biochemical constructs, the dance, antibody promiscuity and chemical orthogonality will be combined in this paper with the notions of in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) signals from digital radio to manifest an approach to molecular recognition that allows a level of discrimination and analysis unobtainable without the aggregate. As an example we present experimental data on the detection of TNT, RDX, C4, ammonium nitrate and musk oil from a system of antibody-coated acoustic wave sensors.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectChemical orthogonalityen_US
dc.subjectDigital radioen_US
dc.subjectAntibody promiscuityen_US
dc.subjectConformational changeen_US
dc.subjectBiosensorsen_US
dc.subjectAcoustic wave biosensorsen_US
dc.titleAnalogies Between Digital Radio and Chemical Orthogonality as a Method for Enhanced Analysis of Molecular Recognition Eventsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Center for Organic Photonics and Electronicsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameZen Sensingen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Electrical and Computer Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameOak Ridge National Laboratory. Center for Advanced Studiesen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameSamsung Electronicsen_US
dc.publisher.originalMDPIen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijms9020154


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