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dc.contributor.authorAravamudhan, Shyam
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-09T20:18:08Z
dc.date.available2012-11-09T20:18:08Z
dc.date.issued2012-10-23
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/45284
dc.descriptionShyam Aravamudhan presented a lecture at the Nano@Tech Meeting on October 23, 2012 at 12 noon in room 1116 of the Marcus Nanotechnology Building.en_US
dc.descriptionShyam Aravamudhan is currently an Assistant Professor of Nanoengineering at the Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering (JSNN), North Carolina A&T State University. Shyam received his PhD in electrical engineering from University of South Florida. He previously worked as a Visiting Research Fellow at the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention and as a Post-doctoral Fellow in the Nanotechnology Research Center/Biomedical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research interests include Nanobioelectronics, MEMS and Microsystems, Nanotoxicology and Bio and Environmental Sensors.
dc.descriptionRuntime: 53:33 minutes
dc.description.abstractIt is essential to thoroughly understand the safety implications of Engineered Nanomaterials (ENs) and the factors that influence their associated potential hazards. Towards this overarching goal, research continues to identify and build associations between specific physicochemical properties of ENs and the corresponding toxicological responses. An emerging “rule of thumb” in nanotoxiology suggests that ENs that are less than 100 nm in diameter can enter cells, those with diameters below 40 nm can enter the cell nucleus and those that are smaller than 35 nm can pass through the blood–brain barrier. Understanding the way these ENs interact with living matter will open up fundamentally new opportunities in multiple applications. Current studies have primarily assessed cytotoxicity of nanomaterials at moderate to high exposure doses. These investigations have overlooked the subtle cellular alterations that may arise at lower concentrations, which may not result in cell death (as required in cytotoxicity tests) but could contribute to health risks. In this talk, our studies in understanding subtle, time-varying cellular responses on exposure to varying ENs will be presented. We will also highlight our efforts to correlate cell-based viability assays to real-time assessment methods – impedance spectroscopy and correlative microscopy.en_US
dc.format.extent53:33 minutes
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectNanotechnologyen_US
dc.subjectCytotoxicityen_US
dc.subjectNanoparticlesen_US
dc.subjectSafetyen_US
dc.titleUnderstanding Toxicology of Engineered Nanomaterialsen_US
dc.typeLectureen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Microelectronics Research Center
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Nanotechnology Research Center
dc.contributor.corporatenameNorth Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University. Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering


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